Home Rule from a Transnational Perspective: The Irish Parliamentary Party and the United Irish League of America, 1901-1918

Home Rule from a Transnational Perspective: The Irish Parliamentary Party and the United Irish League of America, 1901-1918

Author: Tony King

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN: 9781648890857

Category: Political Science

Page: 274

View: 229

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When John Redmond declared ‘No Irishman in America living 3,000 miles away from the homeland ought to think he has a right to dictate to Ireland’ the Irish leader unwittingly made a rod for his own back. In denying the newly-established United Irish League of America any input into party policy formulation, Redmond risked alienating the nation’s largest diaspora should a home rule crisis ever occur. That such a situation developed in 1914 is an established fact. That it was the product of Redmond’s own naivety is open to conjecture. ‘Home Rule from a Transnational Perspective: The Irish Parliamentary Party and the United Irish League of America, 1901-1918’ explores the Irish Party’s subordination of its American affiliate in light of the ultimate demise of constitutional nationalism in Ireland. This book fills a void in Irish American studies. To date, research in this field has been dominated by Clan na Gael and the Irish Revolutionary Brotherhood, particularly the transatlantic links that underpinned the Easter Rising in 1916. Little attention has been paid to the Irish party’s efforts to manage the diaspora in the years preceding the insurrection or to the individuals and organisations that proffered a more moderate solution to the age-old Irish Question. Breaking new ground, it offers a fresh and interesting perspective on the fall of the Home Rule Party and helps to explain the seismic shift towards a more radical approach to gaining independence. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in Irish America, diaspora studies, Irish independence, and/or home rule. It complements the existing historiography and enhances our knowledge of a largely understudied aspect of Irish nationalism.

John Redmond and Irish Unity, 1912-1918

John Redmond and Irish Unity, 1912-1918

Author: Joseph P. Finnan

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815630433

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 332

View: 788

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In his treatment of Redmond, Joseph P. Finnan demonstrates the multiple identities of the Irish Parliamentary Party as nationalist, liberal, and Catholic. He looks at Home Rule as part of a federal solution to the Irish question within the United Kingdom, the reasons for the failure of Redmond's war policies, and the collapse of the Irish Parliamentary Party as part of the wider phenomenon of the decline of liberalism during the Great War. As he looks at Irish nationalism in its worldwide context, Finnan also shows how Redmond's handling of organizational problems in America sets the pattern for his later handling of similar problems in Ireland.

Spies, Informers and the "Anti-Sinn Féin Society"

Spies, Informers and the

Author: John Borgonovo

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015066825814

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 837

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The book is a study of the shooting of suspected civilian informers by the Cork city IRA in 1920-1921. During a one-year period, at least twenty-four Cork civilians died at the hands of the IRA, including a two-week span that saw eight civilians shot. IRA sources claim some of the civilians were members of an Anti-Sinn Fein Society, a pro-British intelligence network operating in the city. The book analyses the existence of such a network, alleged IRA persecution of ex-soldiers, and the strength of the IRA intelligence efforts in Cork city. It places these trends in the context of both the British reprisal campaign in Cork city, and the IRA's guerrilla struggle. The book contains significant original research that focuses on events in Cork city in 1920-1921. Chapters on the British reprisal campaign, the IRA intelligence network, and the trends of the conflict provide unique evidence and conclusions regarding the situation in Cork city, which have not been published in any other work and directly contradicts some conclusions made in Peter Hart's The IRA and its Enemies.

The Vatican, the Bishops and Irish Politics 1919-39

The Vatican, the Bishops and Irish Politics 1919-39

Author: Dermot Keogh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521530520

Category: History

Page: 324

View: 594

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A detailed study of the political relations between church and state in modern Ireland, this work is also an analysis of domestic politics within the context of Anglo-Vatican relations. Dealing exclusively with high ecclesiastical politics, it assesses the relative political strength of both the British and the Irish at the Vatican and challenges 'the myth of English dominance over the Papacy'. Dermot Keogh traces the 'quiet diplomacy' of bishops, politicians and the Vatican from the turbulent years of 1919-21, through the civil war period and the rule of William T. Cosgrove and Cumann na nGaedheal, to the re-emergence of Eamon de Valera and Fianna Fail as exponents of Catholic nationalism in the 1930s. The book draws extensively on unpublished documents and, for the first time, explores with the aid of primary sources the exchanges between bishops, politicians and the Vatican over a twenty-year period. It is an important contribution to the history of modern Ireland, Irish-Vatican and Anglo-Vatican relations, whose findings will lead to a radical revision of interpretations of Irish church-state relations.

Limerick Constitutional Nationalism, 1898-1918

Limerick Constitutional Nationalism, 1898-1918

Author: Tadhg Moloney

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443819985

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 888

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This book analyses local politics in Limerick from 1898 to 1918, reaching back to the Parnellite split and forward to the post-independence era. It explores at local level the relevance of the commemoration of 1798, the reunification of the Irish Parliamentary Party, and the emergence of multiple cultural political movements as well as the demise of Unionism. The question posed is twofold: whether nationalist constitutional politics changed over this time period on the one hand, and whether they were driven by local or national concerns on the other. The conclusion is that the spirit of politics was intensely local, that political patronage was largely locally controlled, and that there were greater continuities than ruptures in the composition and behaviour of political elites. In fact, long-term continuities of personnel, social class and political allegiance existed side-by side with the ability of existing structures to absorb change and to adapt in the light of wider political developments and internal manoeuvres.

The Evolution of Irish Nationalist Politics

The Evolution of Irish Nationalist Politics

Author: Tom Garvin

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN: 9780717163892

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 964

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Professor Tom Garvin’s classic work studies the growth of nationalism in Ireland from the middle of the eighteenth century to modern times. It traces the continuity of tradition from earlier organisations, such as the United Irishmen and the agrarian Ribbonmen of the eighteenth century, through the followers of Daniel O’Connell, the Fenians and the Land League in the nineteenth century to the Irish political parties of today, including Sinn Féin, Fianna Fáil, Labour Party and Fine Gael. The dual nature of Irish nationalism is shown in sharp focus. Despite the secular and liberal leanings of many Irish leaders and theoreticians, their followers were frequently sectarian and conservative in social outlook. This book demonstrates how this dual legacy has influenced the politics of modern Ireland. The Evolution of Irish Nationalist Politics: Table of Contents Irish parties and Irish politics The Irish republic: post-colonial politics in a western European state Political culture and political organisation Geography, economics and method The origins of Irish popular politics Roots of Irish popular nationalism The beginnings of urban radical political organisation, 1750–1800 Agrarianism, religion and revolution, 1760–1800 The development of nationalist popular politics, 1800–48 Secret societies before the Famine: the rise of Ribbonism Political mobilisation in pre-Famine nationalist Ireland Secret societies and party politics after the Famine The social background Electoral politics after the Famine The recrudescence of republicanism: Fenianism and the Agrarians The IRB and Irish politics after the Land War Agrarianism, nationalism and party politics, 1874–95 Political mobilisation and the agrarian campaign The development of the Irish National League The Parnell split: the collapse of the Irish National League The reconstruction of nationalist politics, 1891–1910 The rebuilding of the parliamentary party The rise of the Hibernians The new nationalism and military conspiracy, 1900–16 The development of cultural nationalism and the origins of Sinn Féin Fenians, Volunteers and insurrection Elections, revolution and civil war, 1916–23 The rise of Sinn Féin The electoral landslide of December 1918 The Republic of Ireland, 1919–23 The origins of the party system in independent Ireland The ancestry of the Irish party system The legitimation of the state and the building of political parties An analysis of electoral politics, 1923–48 Parties and elections in the Irish Free State Turnout, 1922–44 Sinn Féin III/Fianna Fáil Cumann na nGaedheal/Fine Gael The Labour Party The farmers’ parties The break-up of the Treaty party system The roots of party and government in independent Ireland The central place of party in Irish politics Party and the physical force tradition The evolution of the Irish state Party and government in independent Ireland Some comparative perspectives Liberal democracy The party system in comparative perspective

Irish Home Rule, 1867-1921

Irish Home Rule, 1867-1921

Author: Alan O'Day

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 071903776X

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 450

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IRISH HOME RULE considers the preeminent issue in British politics during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The book separates moral and material home rulers and appraises the home rule movement from a fresh angle, distinguishing between physical force and constitutional nationalists.

The Legacy of the Irish Parliamentary Party

The Legacy of the Irish Parliamentary Party

Author: Martin O'Donoghue

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781789620306

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 921

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The first detailed analysis of the legacy of the Irish Parliamentary Party in independent Ireland. Providing statistical analysis of the extent of Irish Party heritage in each Dáil and Seanad in the period, it analyses how party followers reacted to independence and examines the place of its leaders in public memory.