Universal Jurisdiction in Modern International Law

Universal Jurisdiction in Modern International Law

Author: Mitsue Inazumi

Publisher: Intersentia nv

ISBN: 9789050953665

Category: Law

Page: 286

View: 583

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This study is based on the following questions: Which jurisdiction can and should be exercised for the prosecution of individuals responsible for gross and serious violations of human rights? And especially, in this regard, what is the role of universal jurisdiction? In explaining the modern jurisdictional regime, this study illuminates the historical phenomenon of the expansion of jurisdiction in Chapter II, and conducts in-depth research particularly into universal jurisdiction in Chapter III and IV. This study explicates the notion of universal jurisdiction in history and in theory, categorizing its nature by two aspects (permissive or obligatory, and supplemental or primary), and underscores the differences between ordinary universal jurisdiction and universal jurisdiction in absentia. Having made an analysis on the legality of jurisdiction, this study has proceeded to examine the appropriateness of exercising jurisdiction. Noting the danger of conflicts of jurisdiction, Chapter V attempts to compile some guiding rules that can be utilised in determining the appropriateness of jurisdiction, thus answering the question of Which jurisdiction should be exercised'. Chapter VI then applies these guiding rules to non-territorial jurisdiction, namely universal jurisdiction. The observations deduced from the application of the guiding rules demonstrates, together with the analysis of the legality of universal jurisdiction in Chapter IV, the role of universal jurisdiction within the modern jurisdictional regime.

Universal Jurisdiction

Universal Jurisdiction

Author: Stephen Macedo

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812219503

Category: Law

Page: 398

View: 266

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Universal jurisdiction is becoming a potent instrument of international law, but it is poorly understood by legal experts and remains a mystery to most public officials and citizens.

Complementarity and the Exercise of Universal Jurisdiction for Core International Crimes

Complementarity and the Exercise of Universal Jurisdiction for Core International Crimes

Author: Morten Bergsmo

Publisher: Torkel Opsahl Academic EPublisher

ISBN: 9788293081142

Category: Law

Page: 314

View: 926

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This book concerns the relationship between the principles of complementarity and universal jurisdiction. Territorial States are normally affected most strongly by core international crimes committed during a conflict or an attack directed against its civilian population. Most victims reside in such States. Most damaged or plundered property is there. Public order and security are violated most severely in the territorial States. It is also on their territory that most of the evidence of the alleged crimes can be found. There are, in other words, obvious policy and practical reasons why States should accord priority to territoriality as a basis of jurisdiction. But is there also an obligation for States to defer exercise of universal jurisdiction of core international crimes to investigation and prosecution of the same crimes by the territorial State? What - if any - is the impact of the principle of complementarity in this respect? These are among the questions discussed in this anthology.

Universal Jurisdiction in International Criminal Law

Universal Jurisdiction in International Criminal Law

Author: Aisling O'Sullivan

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317301219

Category: Law

Page: 222

View: 238

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With the sensational arrest of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet in 1998, the rise to prominence of universal jurisdiction over crimes against international law seemed to be assured. The arrest of Pinochet and the ensuing proceedings before the UK courts brought universal jurisdiction into the foreground of the "fight against impunity" and the principle was read as an important complementary mechanism for international justice –one that could offer justice to victims denied an avenue by the limited jurisdiction of international criminal tribunals. Yet by the time of the International Court of Justice’s Arrest Warrant judgment four years later, the picture looked much bleaker and the principle was being read as a potential tool for politically motivated trials. This book explores the debate over universal jurisdiction in international criminal law, aiming to unpack a practice in which international lawyers continue to disagree over the concept of universal jurisdiction. Using Martti Koskenniemi’s work as a foil, this book exposes the argumentative techniques in operation in national and international adjudication since the 1990s. Drawing on overarching patterns within the debate, Aisling O’Sullivan argues that it is bounded by a tension between contrasting political preferences or positions, labelled as moralist ("ending impunity") and formalist ("avoiding abuse") and she reads the debate as a movement of hegemonic and counter-hegemonic positions that struggle for hegemonic control. However, she draws out how these positions (moralist/formalist) merge into one another and this produces a tendency towards a "middle" position that continues to prefer a particular preference (moralist or formalist). Aisling O’Sullivan then traces the transformation towards this tendency that reflects an internal split among international lawyers between building a utopia ("court of humanity") and recognizing its impossibility of being realized.

Piracy and the Origins of Universal Jurisdiction

Piracy and the Origins of Universal Jurisdiction

Author: Mark Chadwick

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004390461

Category: Law

Page: 290

View: 953

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In Piracy and the Origins of Universal Jurisdiction, Mark Chadwick relates a colourful account of how and why piracy on the high seas came to be considered an international crime subject to the principle of universal jurisdiction, prosecutable by any State in any circumstances.

Jurisdiction in International Law

Jurisdiction in International Law

Author: Cedric Ryngaert

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199544714

Category: Law

Page: 267

View: 204

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Public international law approaches to jurisdiction -- The territoriality principle -- The principles of extraterritorial criminal jurisdiction -- A reasonable exercise of jurisdiction -- A new theory of jurisdiction in international law

Universal Jurisdiction in International Criminal Law

Universal Jurisdiction in International Criminal Law

Author: Aisling O'Sullivan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317301202

Category: Law

Page: 222

View: 358

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With the sensational arrest of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet in 1998, the rise to prominence of universal jurisdiction over crimes against international law seemed to be assured. The arrest of Pinochet and the ensuing proceedings before the UK courts brought universal jurisdiction into the foreground of the "fight against impunity" and the principle was read as an important complementary mechanism for international justice –one that could offer justice to victims denied an avenue by the limited jurisdiction of international criminal tribunals. Yet by the time of the International Court of Justice’s Arrest Warrant judgment four years later, the picture looked much bleaker and the principle was being read as a potential tool for politically motivated trials. This book explores the debate over universal jurisdiction in international criminal law, aiming to unpack a practice in which international lawyers continue to disagree over the concept of universal jurisdiction. Using Martti Koskenniemi’s work as a foil, this book exposes the argumentative techniques in operation in national and international adjudication since the 1990s. Drawing on overarching patterns within the debate, Aisling O’Sullivan argues that it is bounded by a tension between contrasting political preferences or positions, labelled as moralist ("ending impunity") and formalist ("avoiding abuse") and she reads the debate as a movement of hegemonic and counter-hegemonic positions that struggle for hegemonic control. However, she draws out how these positions (moralist/formalist) merge into one another and this produces a tendency towards a "middle" position that continues to prefer a particular preference (moralist or formalist). Aisling O’Sullivan then traces the transformation towards this tendency that reflects an internal split among international lawyers between building a utopia ("court of humanity") and recognizing its impossibility of being realized.

Research Handbook on Jurisdiction and Immunities in International Law

Research Handbook on Jurisdiction and Immunities in International Law

Author: Alexander Orakhelashvili

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 9781783472185

Category: LAW

Page: 560

View: 310

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This Research Handbook provides a comprehensive and up-to-date analysis of the international law of jurisdiction and immunities, illustrating those aspects in which the law of jurisdiction and law of immunities are mutually interdependent, as well as shedding light on the implications of that interdependence. With authoritative contributions from recognized experts, it offers an impartial perspective on the applicable international law, independent from any positions held in governmental or other institutional circles. Authoritative and well-structured, the book covers all major topics in relation to jurisdiction and immunities, such as conceptual justifications for jurisdiction and immunities, extra-territorial jurisdiction, types of available immunities, normative basis for jurisdiction and immunity claims in various types of judicial proceedings. It explores the complex questions arising when a state asserts its jurisdiction over persons that are based abroad, or are not that state’s citizens, or otherwise have no connection with that state, as well as how tensions are further heightened when one state tries to assert jurisdiction, in its own courts, over another state or an international organization such as the UN. This much-needed Handbook will appeal strongly to academic researchers and postgraduate students. Civil servants and employees of international organizations and NGOs will also find it an invaluable resource.