The Twenty Years' Crisis, 1919-1939

The Twenty Years' Crisis, 1919-1939

Author: E.H. Carr

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781349950768

Category: Political Science

Page: 233

View: 856

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E.H. Carr's Twenty Years' Crisis is a classic work in International Relations. Published in 1939, on the eve of World War II, it was immediately recognized by friend and foe alike as a defining work in the fledgling discipline. The author was one of the most influential and controversial intellectuals of the twentieth century. The issues and themes he develops in this book continue to have relevance to modern day concerns with power and its distribution in the international system. Michael Cox's critical introduction provides the reader with background information about the author, the context for the book, its main themes and contemporary relevance. Written with the student in mind, it offers a guide to understanding a complex, but crucial text. Now updated with a new preface from Michael Cox.

The Twenty Years' Crisis, 1919-1939

The Twenty Years' Crisis, 1919-1939

Author: Edward Hallett Carr

Publisher: Macmillan Pub Limited

ISBN: 0333644697

Category: History

Page: 236

View: 658

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E.H. Carr's Twenty Years' Crisis is a classic work in international relations. Published in 1939, on the eve of World War II, it was immediately recognized by friend and foe alike as a defining work in the fledgling discipline. The author was one of the most influential and controversial intellectuals of the 20th century. The issues and themes he develops in this book continue to have relevance to modern day concerns with power and its distribution in the international system.

The New Twenty Years' Crisis

The New Twenty Years' Crisis

Author: Philip Cunliffe

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780228002413

Category: Political Science

Page:

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The liberal order is decaying. Will it survive, and if not, what will replace it? On the eightieth anniversary of the publication of E.H. Carr's The Twenty Years' Crisis, 1919-1939, Philip Cunliffe revisits this classic text, juxtaposing its claims with contemporary debates on the rise and fall of the liberal international order. The New Twenty Years' Crisis reveals that the liberal international order experienced a twenty-year cycle of decline from 1999 to 2019. In contrast to claims that the order has been undermined by authoritarian challengers, Cunliffe argues that the primary drivers of the crisis are internal. He shows that the heavily ideological international relations theory that has developed since the end of the Cold War is clouded by utopianism, replacing analysis with aspiration and expressing the interests of power rather than explaining its functioning. As a result, a growing tendency to discount political alternatives has made us less able to adapt to political change. In search of a solution, this book argues that breaking through the current impasse will require not only dissolving the new forms of utopianism, but also pushing past the fear that the twenty-first century will repeat the mistakes of the twentieth. Only then can we finally escape the twenty years' crisis. By reflecting on Carr's foundational work, The New Twenty Years' Crisis offers an opportunity to take stock of the current state of international order and international relations theory.

The Twenty Years' Crisis, 1919-1939

The Twenty Years' Crisis, 1919-1939

Author: E.H. Carr

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 3319414070

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 882

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E.H. Carr's Twenty Years' Crisis is a classic work in International Relations. Published in 1939, on the eve of World War II, it was immediately recognized by friend and foe alike as a defining work in the fledgling discipline. The author was one of the most influential and controversial intellectuals of the twentieth century. The issues and themes he develops in this book continue to have relevance to modern day concerns with power and its distribution in the international system. Michael Cox's critical introduction provides the reader with background information about the author, the context for the book, its main themes and contemporary relevance. Written with the student in mind, it offers a guide to understanding a complex, but crucial text. Now updated with a new preface from Michael Cox.

The Political Discourse of Anarchy

The Political Discourse of Anarchy

Author: Brian C. Schmidt

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN: 9781438419015

Category: Political Science

Page: 328

View: 851

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A disciplinary history of the field of international relations from its emergence in the mid-1800s until the outbreak of World War II.

Thinkers of the Twenty Years' Crisis : Inter-War Idealism Reassessed

Thinkers of the Twenty Years' Crisis : Inter-War Idealism Reassessed

Author: David Long

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 9780191590825

Category:

Page: 360

View: 946

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This book reassesses the contribution to international thought of some of the most important thinkers of the inter-war period. It takes as its starting point E. H. Carr's famous critique which, more than any other work, established the reputation of the period as the `utopian' or `idealist' phase of international relations theorizing. This characterization of inter-war thought is scrutinized through ten detailed studies of such writers as Norman Angell, J. A. Hobson, J. M. Keynes, David Mitrany, and Alfred Zimmern. The studies demonstrate the diversity of perspectives within `idealism' and call into question the descriptive and analytical value of the entire notion. It is concluded that `idealism' is an overly general term, useful for scoring debating points rather than providing a helpful category for analysis.

E. H. Carr and International Relations

E. H. Carr and International Relations

Author: Charles Jones

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521478642

Category: Political Science

Page: 206

View: 457

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E. H. Carr is widely remembered as an influential theorist of international relations. The scourge of inter-war idealists, he became the best-known Briton in a generation of predominantly American political realists. But Carr's realism differed greatly from that of his contemporaries: a vigorous advocate of social and economic planning and friend of the Soviet Union, he stood closer to Lenin than to Morgenthau. In this book Charles Jones makes sense of Carr's distinctive form of realism by examining his rhetoric and the reciprocal relationship between theory and policy-making in his writings. Close attention is paid to the period from 1936, when Carr left the Foreign Office, through his subsequent career as a one-man foreign ministry at Aberystwyth, the Ministry of Information, and above all The Times, culminating in the final frustration of his schemes for continued British world power in 1947.

Roots of Realism

Roots of Realism

Author: Benjamin Frankel

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0714642037

Category: Political Science

Page: 456

View: 702

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Realism is not a single theory, but a family of theories. The realist theories differ from each other in important respects, but they all share a common philosophical core: they are all grounded in an understanding of international politics, and politics more generally, as a constant struggle for, and conflict over, power and security. The different realist readings focus on a single theme: how states preserve their existence and protect their interests in an anarchic environment in which dangers to security and welfare are always present, and in which survival itself is not assured. The problems faced by states are compounded by the fact that pursuit by one state of its own security and autonomy impinges upon, and may well limit, the security and autonomy of other states. The essays in this volume discuss different realist readings from antiquity to the present. They examine the interpretations of international politics offered by realist thinkers and practitioners from the sophists, Thucydides, Machiavelli, and Hobbes, to E. H. Carr, Hans Morgenthau, Reinhold Niebuhr, Winston Churchill, and George Kennan.

Bridges and Boundaries

Bridges and Boundaries

Author: Colin Elman

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262550393

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 776

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Bridges and Boundaries offers a conversation between what might loosely be described as traditionalist diplomatic and military historians, and political scientists who employ qualitative case study methods to examine international relations. The book opens with a series of chapters discussing differences, commonalities, and opportunities for cross-fertilization between the two disciplines.To help focus the dialogue on real events and research, the volume then revisits three empirical topics that have been studied at length by members of both disciplines: British hegemony in the nineteenth century; diplomacy in the interwar period and the causes of World War II; and the origins and course of the Cold War. For each of these subjects, a political scientist, a historian, and a commentator reflect on how disciplinary "guild rules" have shaped the study of international events. The book closes with incisive overviews by Robert Jervis and Paul W. Schroeder. Bridges and Boundaries explores how historians and political scientists can learn from one another and illustrates the possibilities that arise when open-minded scholars from different disciplines sit down to talk.

Beyond Anarchy

Beyond Anarchy

Author: Dylan

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9783838262314

Category: Political Science

Page: 302

View: 163

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Realism has been the most influential theoretical approach in international relations since the discipline was born. Yet realism, for all its popularity, has always been criticised for its narrow world view of a system of states all seeking power, security and survival in a world of anarchy. Additionally, realism has struggled to provide explanations for some of the major events and evolutions in world politics. The timing of the outbreak of wars, the disappearance of superpowers and trends of regionalisation are all inadequately explained by realism, leaving the critic to ask, simply, why? Dylan Kissane answers this question by going to the core of realist theory and arguing that realism‘s problems stem from a critical yet flawed assumption about the nature of the international system. By assuming an anarchical system, realists diminish the complexity of international politics and blind themselves to the impact of substate actors. In this book, Kissane opens the door to re-founding international relations theory not on anarchy but on the assumption of a complex international system. Drawing on an interdisciplinary literature and offering a novel application of complexity theory to international politics, Beyond Anarchy is the beginning of a new and exciting stream of international relations theory for the twenty-first century.