Knowing Poetry

Knowing Poetry

Author: Adrian Armstrong

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801461065

Category: History

Page: 264

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In the later Middle Ages, many writers claimed that prose is superior to verse as a vehicle of knowledge because it presents the truth in an unvarnished form, without the distortions of meter and rhyme. Beginning in the thirteenth century, works of verse narrative from the early Middle Ages were recast in prose, as if prose had become the literary norm. Instead of dying out, however, verse took on new vitality. In France verse texts were produced, in both French and Occitan, with the explicit intention of transmitting encyclopedic, political, philosophical, moral, historical, and other forms of knowledge. In Knowing Poetry, Adrian Armstrong and Sarah Kay explore why and how verse continued to be used to transmit and shape knowledge in France. They cover the period between Jean de Meun’s Roman de la rose (c. 1270) and the major work of Jean Bouchet, the last of the grands rhétoriqueurs (c. 1530). The authors find that the advent of prose led to a new relationship between poetry and knowledge in which poetry serves as a medium for serious reflection and self-reflection on subjectivity, embodiment, and time. They propose that three major works—the Roman de la rose, the Ovide moralisé, and Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy—form a single influential matrix linking poetry and intellectual inquiry, metaphysical insights, and eroticized knowledge. The trio of thought-world-contingency, poetically represented by Philosophy, Nature, and Fortune, grounds poetic exploration of reality, poetry, and community.

George Chastelain and the Shaping of Valois Burgundy

George Chastelain and the Shaping of Valois Burgundy

Author: Graeme Small

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 0861932374

Category: History

Page: 326

View: 791

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Few texts offer as many insights into the history of Valois Burgundy as the work of George Chastelain (c.1414-1475), official chronicler to the dukes Philip the Good and Charles the Bold. Chastelain, a trusted courtier, closely observed his masters' authority in the many dominions they ruled in the Low Countries and France, and the role they played in the political life of neighbouring kingdoms and principalities and in Christendom as a whole. This is the first historical study of Chastelain in over half a century. An account of his life and career is followed by a study of the chronicle, Chastelain's interpretation within it of ducal actions and aspirations, and the role it played in the historical culture of the governing classes in the Netherlands after the death of the last duke in 1477. Overall, Dr Small offers a complete reappraisal of the political ambitions of the ducal elite, particularly with regard to the supposed evolution of the ducal dominions into a `Burgundian state' quite distinct from the Kingdom of France. Dr GRAEME SMALL is lecturer in medieval history, University of Glasgow.

Poets, Patrons, and Printers

Poets, Patrons, and Printers

Author: Cynthia J. Brown

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501742538

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 308

View: 737

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Cynthia J. Brown explains why the advent of print in the late medieval period brought about changes in relationships among poets, patrons, and printers which led to a new conception of authorship. Examining such paratextual elements of manuscripts as title pages, colophons, and illustrations as well as such literary strategies as experimentation with narrative voice, Brown traces authors' attempts to underscore their narrative presence in their works and to displace patrons from their role as sponsors and protectors of the book. Her accounts of the struggles of poets, including Jean Lemaire, Jean Bouchet, Jean Molinet, and Pierre Gringore, over the design, printing, and sale of their books demonstrate how authors secured the status of literary proprietor during the transition from the culture of script and courtly patronage to that of print capitalism.

Vernacular Literature and Current Affairs in the Early Sixteenth Century

Vernacular Literature and Current Affairs in the Early Sixteenth Century

Author: Jennifer Britnell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351763790

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 238

View: 607

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This title was first published in 2000: The printed writings of the most important authors of the sixteenth century are characterised by frequent references to current affairs. This collection brings together essays by literary scholars and historians of the era to discuss various ways in which those writing in the vernacular during the early sixteenth century responded to contemporary events. The papers in this volume also demonstrate how the spread of literacy was of fundamental significance for the economics of book production, and for ways in which political power was exercised and expressed, as well as for the development of new literary forms of critical and occasional writing.

Medieval France

Medieval France

Author: William W. Kibler

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780824044442

Category: History

Page: 2071

View: 525

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Arranged alphabetically, with a brief introduction that clearly defines the scope and purpose of the book. Illustrations include maps, B/W photographs, genealogical tables, and lists of architectural terms.

Publishing Networks in France in the Early Era of Print

Publishing Networks in France in the Early Era of Print

Author: Diane E. Booton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351778053

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 252

View: 546

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This book examines commercial and personal connections in the early modern book trade in Paris and northwestern France, ca. 1450–1550. The book market, commercial trade, and geo-political ties connected the towns of Paris, Caen, Angers, Rennes, and Nantes, making this a fertile area for the transference of different fields of knowledge via book culture. Diane Booton investigates various aspects of book production (typography and illustration), market (publishers and booksellers), and ownership (buyers and annotators) and describes commercial and intellectual dissemination via established pathways, drawing on primary and archival sources.

Chartier in Europe

Chartier in Europe

Author: Emma Cayley

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 9781843841760

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 548

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The significance of the works of Alain Chartier in the development of European literature.

Shaping the Archive in Late Medieval England

Shaping the Archive in Late Medieval England

Author: Sarah Elliott Novacich

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316828588

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

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Sarah Elliott Novacich explores how medieval thinkers pondered the ethics and pleasures of the archive. She traces three episodes of sacred history - the loss of Eden, the loading of Noah's ark, and the Harrowing of Hell - across works of poetry, performance records, and iconography in order to demonstrate how medieval artists turned to sacred history to think through aspects of cultural transmission. Performances of the loss of Eden blur the relationship between original and record; stories of Noah's ark foreground the difficulty of compiling inventories; and engagements with the Harrowing of Hell suggest the impossibility of separating the past from the present. Reading Middle English plays alongside chronicles, poetry, and works of visual art, Shaping the Archive in Late Medieval England considers how poetic form, staging logistics, and the status of performance all contribute to our understanding of the ways in which medieval thinkers imagined the archive.

Music, Authorship, and the Book in the First Century of Print

Music, Authorship, and the Book in the First Century of Print

Author: Kate van Orden

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520957114

Category: Music

Page: 256

View: 134

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What does it mean to author a piece of music? What transforms the performance scripts written down by musicians into authored books? In this fascinating cultural history of Western music’s adaptation to print, Kate van Orden looks at how musical authorship first developed through the medium of printing. When music printing began in the sixteenth century, publication did not always involve the composer: printers used the names of famous composers to market books that might include little or none of their music. Publishing sacred music could be career-building for a composer, while some types of popular song proved too light to support a reputation in print, no matter how quickly they sold. Van Orden addresses the complexities that arose for music and musicians in the burgeoning cultures of print, concluding that authoring books of polyphony gained only uneven cultural traction across a century in which composers were still first and foremost performers.

Christine de Pizan : Texts/intertexts/contexts

Christine de Pizan : Texts/intertexts/contexts

Author: Marilynn Desmond

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816630801

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 316

View: 898

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Christine de Pizan, an Italian-born writer in French in the early 15th century, composed lyric poetry, debate poetry, political biography, and allegory. Her texts constantly negotiate the hierarchical and repressive discourses of late medieval court culture. How they do so is the focus of this volume, which places Christine's work in the context of larger discussions about medieval authorship, identity, and categories of difference.

Building the Text

Building the Text

Author: David Cowling

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0198159595

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 266

View: 720

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Descriptions of imaginary buildings abound in late medieval and early modern texts in France. This book examines the reasons for their popularity and analyzes the way in which metaphors of the building were used by writers as a tools of persuasion. One such writer was Jean Lemaire (c.1473-after 1515) who used architectural metaphor both to praise his patrons and to advertise his own talents, while drawing on and transforming a tradition of writing popularized by his rhétoriqueur predecessors.