The Naval Chronicle: Volume 27, January-July 1812

The Naval Chronicle: Volume 27, January-July 1812

Author: James Stanier Clarke

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108018661

Category: History

Page: 572

View: 281

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Volume 27 of the Naval Chronicle (1812) describes worsening Anglo-American diplomatic relations and the assassination of the Prime Minister.

The Naval Chronicle: Volume 39, January-July 1818

The Naval Chronicle: Volume 39, January-July 1818

Author: James Stanier Clarke

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108018784

Category: History

Page: 566

View: 937

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Volume 39 of the Naval Chronicle (1818) includes an autobiography attributed to Napoleon and describes efforts to assist unemployed sailors.

Marshal William Carr Beresford

Marshal William Carr Beresford

Author: Marcus de la Poer Beresford

Publisher: Merrion Press

ISBN: 9781788550345

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 398

View: 335

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Despite a propensity toward fierce criticism of his generals, with great regard the Duke of Wellington referred to William Carr Beresford as 'the ablest man I have yet seen in the army'. Marshal William Carr Beresford is the story of a celebrated and distinguished Irishman, honoured and decorated by the governments of Great Britain, Portugal and Spain, who served as Commander in Chief of the Portuguese army for eleven years. The book follows the trajectory of Beresford's extensive military career. Born the illegitimate son of the 1st Marquis of Waterford, Beresford joined the British army in 1785, serving in the Mediterranean, Egypt, South Africa and South America, before further distinguishing himself - and meeting Wellington's redoubtable esteem - as Marshal of the Portuguese forces during the Peninsular War. Sent to Portugal to rebuild its army in the fight against Napoleon, Beresford was so successful that Wellington integrated the Portuguese and British armed forces in that struggle. Beresford is revealed as a trusted friend and confidant of Wellington, a relationship that was to endure for the rest of their lives. Their ability to work together led to Beresford's appointment as Master General of Ordinance in Wellington's government of 1828. This is the remarkable story of one of the most celebrated and decorated Irish soldiers ever to fight in overseas service, and who was considered in all opinion as the Duke of Wellington's 'strong right arm'. Despite being fiercely critical of his generals, Wellington described Beresford as 'the ablest man in the army' and relied heavily on his Irish-born commander. Marshal Sir William Carr Beresford was the illegitimate son of the 1st Marquis of Waterford and rose to the rank of General in the British army and Marshal to the Portuguese forces during the Peninsular War. Sent to Portugal to rebuild its demoralised forces against Napoleon, Beresford was so successful that Wellington combined the Portuguese and British regiments and positioned Beresford as commander-in-chief. Their friendship and trust are revealed in their correspondence, which shows them not only writing to each other almost daily but meeting regularly to discuss strategy or to socialise. It was an amicable and supportive relationship that continued for the rest of their lives, leading to Beresford's appointment as Master General of Ordinance in Wellington's first government in 1828.

In Nelson's Wake

In Nelson's Wake

Author: James Davey

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300217322

Category: History

Page: 582

View: 527

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Battles, blockades, convoys, raids: how the indefatigable British Royal Navy ensured Napoleon’s ultimate defeat Horatio Nelson’s celebrated victory over the French at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 presented Britain with an unprecedented command of the seas. Yet the Royal Navy’s role in the struggle against Napoleonic France was far from over. This groundbreaking book asserts that, contrary to the accepted notion that the Battle of Trafalgar essentially completed the Navy’s task, the war at sea actually intensified over the next decade, ceasing only with Napoleon’s final surrender. In this dramatic account of naval contributions between 1803 and 1815, James Davey offers original and exciting insights into the Napoleonic wars and Britain’s maritime history. Encompassing Trafalgar, the Peninsular War, the War of 1812, the final campaign against Napoleon, and many lesser known but likewise crucial moments, the book sheds light on the experiences of individuals high and low, from admiral and captain to sailor and cabin boy. The cast of characters also includes others from across Britain—dockyard workers, politicians, civilians—who made fundamental contributions to the war effort, and in so doing, both saved the nation and shaped Britain’s history.