The Dog Encyclopedia

The Dog Encyclopedia

Author: DK

Publisher: Dorling Kindersley Ltd

ISBN: 9781409350026

Category: Pets

Page: 362

View: 867

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This complete catalogue of all things canine is essential reading for dog lovers everywhere. From Beethoven to Toto, dogs have a special relationship with humans and are forever known as man's best friend.?? The enduring loyalty and companionship of our four-legged friends is celebrated throughout The Dog Encyclopedia. Starting with their history, evolution, and anatomy, this beautiful book puts on a show of dogs in art and advertising, sport and service, and religion and culture. Famous dogs in fiction line up alongside heroic helpers. More than 400 dog breeds are introduced, from primitive dogs and working dogs to companion dogs and scent hounds. Each and every breed includes stunning photographs and fact-packed profiles detailing individual character, compatible owner traits, and breed-specific advice. ??If you're bringing home a new pet, this guide comes crammed with top tips for a balanced diet, exercise, grooming, and training, as well as a health section on continuing care, identifying illness, and veterinary visits. ??This perfect pooch package is an indispensable owner's guide and invaluable reference for budding dog whisperers.

Guide to Sources for Agricultural and Biological Research

Guide to Sources for Agricultural and Biological Research

Author: J. Richard Blanchard

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 9780520368842

Category: Science

Page: 748

View: 602

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This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1981.

Empire of Dogs

Empire of Dogs

Author: Aaron Skabelund

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801463235

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 687

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In 1924, Professor Ueno Eizaburo of Tokyo Imperial University adopted an Akita puppy he named Hachiko. Each evening Hachiko greeted Ueno on his return to Shibuya Station. In May 1925 Ueno died while giving a lecture. Every day for over nine years the Akita waited at Shibuya Station, eventually becoming nationally and even internationally famous for his purported loyalty. A year before his death in 1935, the city of Tokyo erected a statue of Hachiko outside the station. The story of Hachiko reveals much about the place of dogs in Japan's cultural imagination. In the groundbreaking Empire of Dogs, Aaron Herald Skabelund examines the history and cultural significance of dogs in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Japan, beginning with the arrival of Western dog breeds and new modes of dog keeping, which spread throughout the world with Western imperialism. He highlights how dogs joined with humans to create the modern imperial world and how, in turn, imperialism shaped dogs' bodies and their relationship with humans through its impact on dog-breeding and dog-keeping practices that pervade much of the world today. In a book that is both enlightening and entertaining, Skabelund focuses on actual and metaphorical dogs in a variety of contexts: the rhetorical pairing of the Western "colonial dog" with native canines; subsequent campaigns against indigenous canines in the imperial realm; the creation, maintenance, and in some cases restoration of Japanese dog breeds, including the Shiba Inu; the mobilization of military dogs, both real and fictional; and the emergence of Japan as a "pet superpower" in the second half of the twentieth century. Through this provocative account, Skabelund demonstrates how animals generally and canines specifically have contributed to the creation of our shared history, and how certain dogs have subtly influenced how that history is told. Generously illustrated with both color and black-and-white images, Empire of Dogs shows that human-canine relations often expose how people—especially those with power and wealth—use animals to define, regulate, and enforce political and social boundaries between themselves and other humans, especially in imperial contexts.

The Invention of the Modern Dog

The Invention of the Modern Dog

Author: Michael Worboys

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421426594

Category: Science

Page: 301

View: 661

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The story of the thoroughly Victorian origins of dog breeds. For centuries, different types of dogs were bred around the world for work, sport, or companionship. But it was not until Victorian times that breeders started to produce discrete, differentiated, standardized breeds. In The Invention of the Modern Dog, Michael Worboys, Julie-Marie Strange, and Neil Pemberton explore when, where, why, and how Victorians invented the modern way of ordering and breeding dogs. Though talk of "breed" was common before this period in the context of livestock, the modern idea of a dog breed defined in terms of shape, size, coat, and color arose during the Victorian period in response to a burgeoning competitive dog show culture. The authors explain how breeders, exhibitors, and showmen borrowed ideas of inheritance and pure blood, as well as breeding practices of livestock, horse, poultry and other fancy breeders, and applied them to a species that was long thought about solely in terms of work and companionship. The new dog breeds embodied and reflected key aspects of Victorian culture, and they quickly spread across the world, as some of Britain’s top dogs were taken on stud tours or exported in a growing international trade. Connecting the emergence and development of certain dog breeds to both scientific understandings of race and blood as well as Britain’s posture in a global empire, The Invention of the Modern Dog demonstrates that studying dog breeding cultures allows historians to better understand the complex social relationships of late-nineteenth-century Britain.

The Dog Encyclopedia

The Dog Encyclopedia

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 0241600898

Category:

Page: 0

View: 262

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Explore the history and variety of our most faithful companions in this visual guide to over 400 different dog breeds. From Afghan Hounds to Yorkshire Terriers, from gun dogs to designer breeds - and from Beethoven to Toto - for centuries, dogs have been adored for their unswerving loyalty, and this new edition of The Dog Encyclopedia provides the perfect celebration of the special relationship that binds humans with our four-legged friends. Starting with their history, evolution, and anatomy, this lavishly illustrated book puts on a show of dogs in art and advertising, sport and service, and religion and culture, as famous dogs in fiction line up alongside heroic helpers. The catalogue introduces more than 400 dog breeds arranged in traditional categories, from primitive and working dogs to companion dogs and scent hounds. Each and every entry includes glorious photographs and fact-packed profiles detailing the individual character, compatible owner traits, and breed-specific advice. The third part of the book offers expert information on everything from exercising and feeding your dog to grooming and puppy training, along with a section on care to help you identify and deal with any canine health problems. Combining fabulous photographs with information on the latest breeds, historical facts, and advice on every-day care, The Dog Encyclopedia is an indispensable owner's guide and a useful reference for professionals.

Encyclopedia of Genetics

Encyclopedia of Genetics

Author: Eric C.R. Reeve

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134263578

Category: Reference

Page: 972

View: 915

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First Published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.