The Medieval Church in Manuscripts

The Medieval Church in Manuscripts

Author: Justin Clegg

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802085989

Category: History

Page: 64

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Illustrations in liturgical books, such as breviaries and missals, as well as books of private devotion, such as psalters and books of hours, reveal the world of the Church in the Middle Ages in vivid detail.

The Drama of the Medieval Church

The Drama of the Medieval Church

Author: Karl Young

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015019119091

Category: Drama, Medieval

Page: 770

View: 701

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Collection of extant examples of church drama employed by the medieval church in western Europe as a part of public workshop; text interspersed with commentary.

Church and Society in the Medieval North of England

Church and Society in the Medieval North of England

Author: R. B. Dobson

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781852851200

Category: Religion

Page: 323

View: 471

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This collection of essays discusses aspects of church life in each of the three dioceses of Carlisle, Durham and York, identifying the main features of religion in the north and placing contemporary religious attitudes in both a social and a local context

The Church in the Medieval Town

The Church in the Medieval Town

Author: T.R. Slater

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351892759

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 796

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This volume of essays explores the interaction of Church and town in the medieval period in England. Two major themes structure the book. In the first part the authors explore the social and economic dimensions of the interaction; in the second part the emphasis moves to the spaces and built forms of towns and their church buildings. The primary emphasis of the essays is upon the urban activities of the medieval Church as a set of institutions: parish, diocese, monastery, cathedral. In these various institutional roles the Church did much to shape both the origin and the development of the medieval town. In exploring themes of topography, marketing and law the authors show that the relationship of Church and town could be both mutually beneficial and a source of conflict.

Money and the Church in Medieval Europe, 1000-1200

Money and the Church in Medieval Europe, 1000-1200

Author: Giles E. M. Gasper

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317094364

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 729

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Bringing together essays from experts in a variety of disciplines, this collection explores two of the most important facets of life within the medieval Europe: money and the church. By focusing on the interactions between these subjects, the volume addresses four key themes. Firstly it offers new perspectives on the role of churchmen in providing conceptual frameworks, from outright condemnation, to sophisticated economic theory, for the use and purpose of money within medieval society. Secondly it discusses the dichotomy of money for the church and its officers: on one hand voices emphasise the moral difficulties in engaging with money, on the other the reality of the ubiquitous use of money in the church at all levels and in places within Christendom. Thirdly it places in dialogue interdisciplinary perspectives and approaches, and evidence from philosophy, history, literature and material culture, to the issues of money and church. Lastly, the volume provides new perspectives on the role of the church in the process of monetization in the High Middle Ages. Concentrating on northern Europe, from the early eleventh century to the beginning of the thirteenth century, the collection is able to explore the profound changes in the use of money and the rise of a money-economy that this period and region witnessed. By adopting a multi-disciplinary approach, the collection challenges current understanding of how money was perceived, understood and used by medieval clergy in a range of different contexts. It furthermore provides wide-ranging contributions to the broader economic and ethical issues of the period, demonstrating how the church became a major force in the process of monetization.

Sacred Trust

Sacred Trust

Author: Robert Burton Ekelund

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195103373

Category: Religion

Page: 210

View: 223

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Without meaning to be irreverent, it is fair to say that in the Middle Ages, at the height of its political and economic power, the Roman Catholic Church functioned in part as a powerful and sophisticated corporation. The Church dealt in a "product" many consumers felt they had to have: the salvation of their immortal souls. The Pope served as its CEO, the College of Cardinals as its board of directors, bishoprics and monasteries as its franchises. And while the Church certainly had moral and social goals, this early antecedent to AT&T and General Motors had economic motives and methods as well, seeking to maximize profits by eliminating competitors and extending its markets. In Sacred Trust: The Medieval Church as an Economic Firm, five highly respected economists advance the controversial argument that the story of the Roman Catholic Church in the Middle Ages is in large part a story of supply and demand. Without denying the centrality--or sincerity--of religious motives, the authors employ the tools of modern economics to analyze how the Church's objectives went well beyond the realm of the spiritual. They explore the myriad sources of the Church's wealth, including tithes and land rents, donations and bequests, judicial services and monastic agricultural production. And they present an in-depth look at the ways in which Church principles on marriage, usury, and crusade were revised as necessary to meet--and in many ways to create--the needs of a vast body of consumers. Along the way, the book raises and answers many intriguing questions. The authors explore the reasons behind the great crusades against the Moslems, probing beyond motives of pure idealism to highlight the Church's concern with revenues from tourism and the sale of relics threatened by Moslem encroachment in the holy lands. They examine the Church's involvement in the marriage market, revealing how the clergy filled their coffers by extracting fees for blessing or dissolving marital unions, for hearing marital disputes, and even for granting permission for blood relatives to wed. And they shed light on the concept of purgatory, showing how this "product innovation" developed by the Church in the twelfth century--a form of "deferred payment"--opened the floodgates for a fresh market in post-mortem atonement through payments on behalf of the deceased. Finally, the authors show how the cumulative costs that the faithful were asked to bear eventually priced the Roman Catholic church out of the market, paving the way for Protestant reformers like Martin Luther. A ground-breaking look at the growth and decline of the medieval Church, Sacred Trust demonstrates how economic reasoning can be used to cast light on the behavior of any complex historical institution. It offers rare insight into one of the great historical powers of Western civilization, in a analysis that will intrigue anyone interested in life in the Middle Ages, in church history, or in the influence of economic motives on historical events.

A History of the Medieval Church

A History of the Medieval Church

Author: Margaret Deanesly

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134955336

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 755

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First published in 1969. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Towards a Theology of Church Growth

Towards a Theology of Church Growth

Author: Dr David Goodhew

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781472413994

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 735

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Concern about church growth and decline is widespread and contentious, yet theological reflection on church growth is scarce. Leading international scholars, including Alister McGrath, Benedicta Ward and C. Kavin Rowe, provide rich resources from scripture, doctrine and tradition, to underpin action to promote church growth and to stimulate further theological reflection on the subject.