The Appropriation of Divine Life in Cyril of Alexandria

The Appropriation of Divine Life in Cyril of Alexandria

Author: Daniel A. Keating

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199267132

Category: Religion

Page: 315

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Daniel A. Keating presents a comprehensive account of sanctification and divinization in Cyril. He argues that Cyril correlates the somatic and pneumatic means of our union with Christ, and integrates the ontological and ethical aspects of our sanctification and divinization.

The Rise of Robert Millikan: Portrait of a Life in American Science

The Rise of Robert Millikan: Portrait of a Life in American Science

Author: Robert H. Kargon

Publisher: Plunkett Lake Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page:

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“I do not consider myself to be Robert Millikan’s biographer. This book is not a full record of Millikan’s life or even of his scientific career. It is an essay, very selective, on themes that are illustrated and illuminated by Millikan’s life in American science. It is, as well, a portrait of the development of a scientist... Robert Millikan was among the most famous of American scientists; to the public of the 1920s, Millikan represented science. The first American-born physicist to win the Nobel Prize, Millikan was a leader in the application of scientific research to military problems during World War I and a guiding force in the rise of the California Institute of Technology to a preeminent place in American scientific education and research. His life is therefore peculiarly suited to illuminate and provide texture for the vast changes that have taken place in science during the twentieth century. In this extended essay, I employ the biographical mode to explore several important aspects of this theme. Millikan was successively a teacher, researcher, administrator, entrepreneur, and sage. By describing the novel roles that he assumed, I suggest how science grew in complexity and carved out an essential place for itself in our general culture.” — Robert H. Kargon, from the Preface of The Rise of Robert Millikan: Portrait of a Life in American Science “Professor Kargon... has given us a sympathetic account of Millikan’s scientific career, including his great triumphs, his rearguard actions to defend untenable positions, and the eventual rejection or revision of every major result or standpoint. But he is more concerned with Millikan’s influence on the developing American physics community and with Millikan’s role in advancing American science generally and American higher education... Together with the chemist A.P. Noyes and the astronomer G.E. Hale, Millikan... believed in an American scientific destiny... This picture of American science is presented with great insight, tremendous learning, and wit... Professor Kargon’s book strikes a happy balance between being an interpretive story of a scientific life and a social history of science in America. Every reader interested in science or in the place of science in society will come away from this book with new information, important insights and a better understanding of the growth of scientific ideas and institutions in the twentieth century.” — I. Bernard Cohen, Nature “With the publication of this volume by Kargon, readers now have new and valuable access to much material about Millikan that was previously unavailable... Kargon states that he is not writing a biography of Millikan but rather a portrait of the man and the scientific scene in early 20th-century America... he has succeeded well in this endeavor... the book is well written, and readers who are already reasonably conversant with 20th-century developments in physics will find much that is illuminating... a genuine contribution to the history of science.” — Katherine R. Sopka, American Scientist “[H]ere is an admirable piece of work... Kargon has not sought to make his readers like his subject, but only to understand his scientific style, his achievements, and his character, and to perceive how his life was ‘a microcosm of new roles assumed by the scientist during the course of the twentieth century’... Kargon’s [...] insights [are] important, and his book [is] deserving of a careful study. “ — Robert C. Post, The American Historical Review “A useful corrective to Millikan’s self-portrait that reveals some of the blemishes, as well as the embellishments, of an important life in American science.” — Robert W. Seidel, Science “For over thirty years, the only overview of Millikan’s life available to the layman was his own selective autobiography. That book either omitted or told only one side (sometimes biased by hindsight) of many important controversial episodes associated with his achievements and views... Kargon’s portrait-essay deals with some of these neglected incidents in a well-written and coherent manner aimed at a wide readership.” — John L. Michel, Technology and Culture “A very readable work with the virtue of containing a great deal of information in a brief compass. Kargon’s book deserves and will receive a wide audience as the successor to its subject’s autobiography... [Kargon] also merits credit for interesting discussions on Millikan as a statesman, administrator, and spokesman for science... a clearly first-rate narrative...” — Nathan Reingold, Isis “Admirably, Kargon combines institutional with intellectual history... Kargon offers a fascinating discussion of Millikan’s and George Hale’s contributions to war research, the California Institute of Technology, and the Mount Wilson Observatory. Kargon rightly stresses the collaborators’ links with the leaders of finance and industry developing Los Angeles... as a brief sketch of Millikan the scientific institution builder, Kargon’s book deserves the wide audience he seeks.” — Peter Galison, The Journal of American History “The book leaves us in no doubt about [Millikan’s] ability, but does not gloss over his occasional obstinacy or his wishful thinking about past errors, matters on which some histories tend to be silent. Millikan was not a revolutionary who started new ideas, but the author stresses — rightly — the importance of men like him for the progress of science.” — Rudolf Peierls, The New York Review of Books “A gem of a book — thought-provoking, insightful, highly interesting reading.” — Lawrence Badash, University of California, Santa Barbara “The author skillfully weaves the story of Millikan with the story of modern science in a book that will be well received by a variety of audiences from professional historians of science to the general public.” — Choice “Kargon’s background in physics serves him well in placing Millikan’s work in its theoretical context, in the analysis of the work itself, and in generally managing to capture both the intense excitement and the routine involved in testing the ideas of the giants of that period in physics... Kargon... has certainly opened enough questions in this perceptive work — in addition to the large number that he has settled; and he has demonstrated an important use for the biographical mode. The general American historian as well as the historian of science can profit from reading this volume.” — George H. Daniels, The Historian “Robert Millikan’s scientific career, his character, and his roles as teacher, administrator at the California Institute of Technology, entrepreneur, and public figure are the topics covered in this biography. Even in discussing Millikan’s later decline as a front-line scientist, author Robert Kargon treats the scientist with compassion and fairness and portrays him as a many-faceted, often controversial man with doubts and uncertainties at the height of his fame... The high school physics student will find this book engaging and insightful in its description of a scientist struggling with science, self, and society.” — A. Cordell Perkes, The Science Teacher “[V]ery well researched and written. Robert Kargon gives an excellent picture of the rise of American physics, from the years when every aspiring young American physicist wanted to go to Germany to study, to the years when every aspiring young European physicist wanted to come to the United States for the same purpose. He clearly understands science, yet knows how to present its history so that it is interesting and meaningful to non-scientists. He tells not only of Millikan’s triumphs, but of his doubts as well; of his discoveries, and also of his mistakes... All in all, this is an excellent book, strongly recommended to the reader who is interested in the history of American science, and in the life of an outstanding practitioner of it.” — Donald E. Osterbrock, The Wisconsin Magazine of History

First Hymn to Life in Congo

First Hymn to Life in Congo

Author: Constant Tsouza

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781493127658

Category: Fiction

Page: 106

View: 709

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Maria had been raped by a way of lifea way of life known as Coconis, which refers to various kinds of vicious, horrific, and inexcusable forms of barbaric behaviour. As a direct consequence of this horrific and violent crime, Maria gave birth a few months later, just like several other young girls who had also become innocent, silent, and secret victims of similar crimes in this country. However, unlike some of the other young woman victims, Maria was blessed with a strong faith in God. She was determined not to resort to taking her own life and not to destroy the tiny life which was already gradually starting to grow inside her womb. Maria had simply decided to transform this violent and hateful act which had stripped her of all human dignity into something much more powerful and good. She wanted to be able to truly forgive, not just the kind of forgiveness given by those who have no choice, but the kind of forgiveness proffered by the weak and feeble to those who are stronger because they have no other choice in the matter. Neither was it the biblical kind when one simply forgives ones fellow men for their sins and wrongdoings. It wasnt like the forgiveness given by God either, but more of Marias own personal and unique quest for forgiveness that she so yearned to be able to give to the young men who had raped her. Maria was determined that her rapists should recognize the brutality and wickedness of their acts and then implore her forgiveness so that she herself could, in turn, sincerely forgive them. It was the only way for her to redeem her personal dignity. She felt that she had suffered enough and that she had every right to expect her rapists recognition of the terrible suffering that they had inflicted on her. So it was on a beautiful sunny Saturday morning of June that Maria finally gave birth to twin boys. She called them Kimia and Elikia (which means peace and faith in the Congolese language). Maria brought up and educated her twin boys in a traditional way. She possessed a sufficient sum of money to pay for their education and see them through to the end of their high school education. She knew that she had done her very best with regard to their civil education. She died not long after receiving her twin sons baccalaurat results. She died in peace, but without having had the opportunity to be able to truly forgive her brutal attackers. She died without anyone coming to ask her for forgiveness and without having been able to offer her sincere forgiveness. But her last thoughts really went out to her wonderful children. She remembered the great ocean of motherly love that she had been able to give them during their upbringing. Before she closed her eyes for the last time, she asked God to bless them. On her deathbed, she didnt have the slightest inkling of the powerful impact of the incredible testimonial that she had succeeded in bequeathing to her children. As Maria, Africa had also been kidnapped, raped (and its not a Belgian story), and tortured for centuries. From those repeated rapes were born sick and weak republics. None of the many rapists did recognize the shameful paternity despite the fact that their saliva and blood were still visible everywhere, and there was no need for complex DNA analysis to find out whom they belong to.

Sentencing Youth to Life in Prison

Sentencing Youth to Life in Prison

Author: Kathi Milliken-Boyd

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000530339

Category: Law

Page: 166

View: 322

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This book analyzes the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court rulings deeming juvenile life without parole (LWOP) sentences to be cruel and unusual punishment. These Court decisions brought about controversy and resistance in the criminal justice field, while at the same time providing hope for those 2,300 people who never thought they had a chance to experience life as an adult outside prison. By looking in depth at the lives of some of the individuals serving life terms, and understanding both the prosecutors who oppose review and resentencing of juvenile lifers and those who are sincerely following the Supreme Court’s guidelines, this book provides a comprehensive understanding of the issues – as well as the people – involved in the sentencing (and potential resentencing) of juveniles to life without the possibility of parole. The authors provide unique, perceptive and straightforward profiles on some of the prisoners who were ultimately sentenced to LWOP after being involved in criminal offenses committed before their 18th birthdays. The book poignantly features the experiences of young people who did not commit a murder yet were still sentenced to life terms, but also delves into the perspectives of the families of victims of juvenile offenders, prosecutors on both sides of the issue, psychologists who have interviewed many of the juvenile lifers and advocates for change in the way juveniles are treated by the criminal justice system. The decisions in Miller v. Alabama and Montgomery v. Louisiana clearly demonstrated that the Court’s view of juveniles evolved over decades to reflect advances in our understanding of the unique characteristics of youth and their involvement in juvenile crimes. This book takes the position that the sentence of life without the possibility of parole for youth is wasteful of both human lives and scarce public resources. The authors write about the human concerns on both sides of the question, and, ultimately, allow readers to make their own decisions about how society should best handle juvenile offenders. This engaging ethnographic treatment will appeal to students and scholars of criminology, corrections, juvenile justice, and delinquency; practitioners working in social policy; and all those interested in a criminal justice system capable of positive outcomes for involved youth.

Change Your Life in 30 Days

Change Your Life in 30 Days

Author: Rhonda Britten

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 039953069X

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 594

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Rhonda Britten, Life Coach on NBC's hit show Starting Over, guides readers on a 30-day step-by-step journey to help define goals and make extraordinary life changes in their lives, using practical insights, exercises, and inspiring wisdom. For those who want to make a major life change but have been too locked in fear to start, the answers lie within this book.

Two Thousand Years of Jewish Life in Morocco

Two Thousand Years of Jewish Life in Morocco

Author: Haïm Zafrani

Publisher: KTAV Publishing House, Inc.

ISBN: 0881257486

Category: History

Page: 327

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The origins of the Jewish community of Morocco are buried in history, but they date back to ancient times, and perhaps to the biblical period. The first Jews in the country migrated there from Israel. Over the centuries, their numbers were increased by converts and then by Jews expelled from Spain and Portugal. After the Muslim conquest, Morocco's Jews, as "people of the book," had dhimmi status, which entailed many restrictions but allowed them to exercise their religion freely. In the mellahs (Jewish quarters) of Morocco's cities and towns, and in the mountainous rural areas, a distinct Jewish culture developed and thrived, unquestionably traditional and Orthodox, yet unique because of the many areas in which it assimilated elements of the local culture and lifestyle, making them its own as it did so. Most of Morocco's Jews settled in Israel after 1948, and many others went to other countries. Wherever they went, their rich cultural heritage went with them, as exemplified by the Maimuna festival, just after Passover, which is now a major occasion on the Israeli calender.

The Craic and Life in the Mountains

The Craic and Life in the Mountains

Author: John O’Dwyer

Publisher: Austin Macauley Publishers

ISBN: 9781398415348

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 234

View: 483

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A nine-year-old boy hooks a twine-held bundle of hay over his shoulder and climbs the harsh steep mountain on a winter morning, with his brother Pat. They trundle upwards against the harsh terrain and elements to fodder the cattle on the hill top. Some 30 years later, Sligo, his adopted town, is in crisis as development tax incentives have expired and three government ministers are refusing to extend those incentives. That young boy emerges in his elder self, strident and resolute, and fights another uphill battle. Another 20 years on, now in Derry, the calling from the mountains of his birth surface within him, urging him to return to regain lost fragments of his soul. His return regenerates and reignites the lost spirit within as voices forgotten in a busy life emerge from the shadowy vibrations of the past to soothe, heal and repair his soul. The journey sees a re-emergence of the people, characters, events and places that formed his character in a rich tapestry of recall.

The Life in Research

The Life in Research

Author: Peter Bartram

Publisher: Grosvenor House Publishing

ISBN: 9781839755613

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 120

View: 362

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If you have interviewed, been interviewed, or enjoyed a career in the field of market or social research, these candid stories from the UK and abroad will evoke many memories of the years when this industry grew to its prominent place in our national life. And although the world of work has seen many changes, it will provide some guidance for those considering such a career, showing that this life is varied and rewarding.

Everyday Life in the German Book Trade

Everyday Life in the German Book Trade

Author: Pamela E. Selwyn

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271031156

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 595

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In his popular book The Germans (1982), Stanford historian Gordon Craig remarked: "When German intellectuals at the end of the eighteenth century talked of living in a Frederican age, they were sometimes referring not to the monarch in Sans Souci, but to his namesake, the Berlin bookseller Friedrich Nicolai." Such was the importance attributed to Nicolai’s role in the intellectual life of his age by his own contemporaries. While long neglected by students of the period, who tended to accept the caricature of him as a philistine who failed to recognize Goethe’s genius, Nicolai has experienced a resurgence of interest among scholars reexploring the German Enlightenment and the literary marketplace of the eighteenth century. This book, drawing upon Nicolai’s large unpublished correspondence, rounds out the picture we have of Nicolai already as author and critic by focusing on his roles as bookseller and publisher and as an Aufkärer in the book trade.

Life in the Studio

Life in the Studio

Author: Frances Palmer

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781648290060

Category: Self-Help

Page: 256

View: 413

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A handbook for leading a creatively fulfilling life, from renowned potter Frances Palmer.