The Implementation of Network-Centric Warfare

The Implementation of Network-Centric Warfare

Author:

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN: 016087338X

Category:

Page: 82

View: 904

Get eBOOK →
As the world enters a new millennium, the U.S. military simultaneously enters a new era in warfare -- an era in which warfare is affected by a changing strategic environment and rapid technological change. The United States and its multinational partners are experiencing a transition from the Industrial Age to the Information Age. Simultaneously, it is fully engaged in a global war on terrorism set in a new period of globalization. These changes, as well as the experiences gained during recent and ongoing military operations, have resulted in the current drive to transform the force with network-centric warfare (NCW) as the centerpiece of this effort. This document describes how the tenets and principles of NCW are providing the foundation for developing new warfighting concepts, organizations, and processes that will allow U.S. forces to maintain a competitive advantage over potential adversaries, now and in the future. In sum, the report provides an overview of the ongoing implementation of NCW in the Department of Defense (DoD). A brief description of NCW, including its origins, its central role in force transformation, its tenets and principles, and an implementation strategy, are provided in Chapter 1. An examination of NCW as an emerging theory of war, its relationship to the four domains of Information Age warfare, the growing evidence of its benefits, and the warfighting advantages it can provide are examined in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 focuses on network-centric operations (NCO), including the relationship of NCO to the overarching Joint Operations Concepts (JOpsC), the NCO experience in Afghanistan and Iraq, the development of the NCO Conceptual Framework, and the conduct of NCO case studies. An overview of Joint and Service plans and initiatives to develop and implement network-centric capabilities and the growing investment in these capabilities by our allies and multinational partners are provided in Chapter 4.

Network-Centric Warfare Implementation and Assessment - War College Series

Network-Centric Warfare Implementation and Assessment - War College Series

Author: Thomas K Braunlinger

Publisher: War College Series

ISBN: 1296474836

Category:

Page: 92

View: 212

Get eBOOK →
This is a curated and comprehensive collection of the most important works covering matters related to national security, diplomacy, defense, war, strategy, and tactics. The collection spans centuries of thought and experience, and includes the latest analysis of international threats, both conventional and asymmetric. It also includes riveting first person accounts of historic battles and wars.Some of the books in this Series are reproductions of historical works preserved by some of the leading libraries in the world. As with any reproduction of a historical artifact, some of these books contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. We believe these books are essential to this collection and the study of war, and have therefore brought them back into print, despite these imperfections.We hope you enjoy the unmatched breadth and depth of this collection, from the historical to the just-published works.

Importing the American Way of War?

Importing the American Way of War?

Author: Ina Wiesner

Publisher: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft

ISBN: 3845247908

Category: Information warfare

Page: 0

View: 343

Get eBOOK →
This study takes a closer look at the adoption of the U.S. military concept of network-centric warfare (NCW) by the British and the German armed forces. The book uncovers the striking differences between NCW adoption in the UK and in Germany in terms of timing, pace, concept faithfulness, and implementation. Relying on the process-tracing technique and framed by an institutionalist argument, the study establishes that a different composition of efficiency/effectiveness and legitimacy-related drivers in the two cases can account for the different adoption outcomes. In the case of NCW adoption, the British military was an efficiency maximizer whereas the German military was a legitimacy maximizer. (Series: Militar und Sozialwissenschaften - Vol. 48)