The History of Greece

The History of Greece

Author: Elaine Thomopoulos

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9780313375125

Category: History

Page: 215

View: 993

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This complete history of Greece documents ancient times to the present, giving specific attention to its emergence as a modern European nation after the destruction, disease, and death Greece suffered during World War II and the subsequent civil war. • Provides an enlightening timeline of the history of Greece from prehistoric time to 2010 • Includes maps illustrating Greece's regions, islands, cities, and its growth into modern Greece • A bibliography covers books and articles about the history, ethnography, and politics of Greece, as well as various online resources

A Concise History of Greece

A Concise History of Greece

Author: Richard Clogg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521004799

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 364

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A revised and extended edition of Richard Clogg's introduction to the history of modern Greece.

Ancient Greece:A History in Eleven Cities

Ancient Greece:A History in Eleven Cities

Author: Paul Cartledge

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780199233380

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 969

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The contribution of the Ancient Greeks to modern western culture is incalculable. In the worlds of art, architecture, myth, literature, and philosophy, the world we live in would be unrecognizably different without the formative influence of Ancient Greek models.Ancient Greek civilization was defined by the city - in Greek, the polis, from which we derive 'politics'. It is above all this feature of Greek civilization that has formed its most enduring legacy, spawning such key terms as aristocracy, oligarchy, tyranny and - last but by no means least - democracy.This highly stimulating introduction to Ancient Greece takes the polis as its starting point. Paul Cartledge uses the history of eleven major Greek cities to illuminate the most important and informative themes in Ancient Greek history, from the first documented use of the Greek language around 1400 BCE, through the glories of the Classical and Hellenistic periods, to the foundation of the Byzantine empire in around CE 330. Covering everything from politics, trade, and travel to slavery,gender, religion, and philosophy, it provides the ideal concise introduction to the history and culture of this remarkable civilization that helped give birth to the world as we know it.

The Rise and Fall of Classical Greece

The Rise and Fall of Classical Greece

Author: Josiah Ober

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691173146

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 440

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A major new history of classical Greece—how it rose, how it fell, and what we can learn from it Lord Byron described Greece as great, fallen, and immortal, a characterization more apt than he knew. Through most of its long history, Greece was poor. But in the classical era, Greece was densely populated and highly urbanized. Many surprisingly healthy Greeks lived in remarkably big houses and worked for high wages at specialized occupations. Middle-class spending drove sustained economic growth and classical wealth produced a stunning cultural efflorescence lasting hundreds of years. Why did Greece reach such heights in the classical period—and why only then? And how, after "the Greek miracle" had endured for centuries, did the Macedonians defeat the Greeks, seemingly bringing an end to their glory? Drawing on a massive body of newly available data and employing novel approaches to evidence, Josiah Ober offers a major new history of classical Greece and an unprecedented account of its rise and fall. Ober argues that Greece's rise was no miracle but rather the result of political breakthroughs and economic development. The extraordinary emergence of citizen-centered city-states transformed Greece into a society that defeated the mighty Persian Empire. Yet Philip and Alexander of Macedon were able to beat the Greeks in the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BCE, a victory made possible by the Macedonians' appropriation of Greek innovations. After Alexander's death, battle-hardened warlords fought ruthlessly over the remnants of his empire. But Greek cities remained populous and wealthy, their economy and culture surviving to be passed on to the Romans—and to us. A compelling narrative filled with uncanny modern parallels, this is a book for anyone interested in how great civilizations are born and die. This book is based on evidence available on a new interactive website. To learn more, please visit: http://polis.stanford.edu/.

Studies in Greek History and Thought

Studies in Greek History and Thought

Author: P. A. Brunt

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: UVA:X002254054

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 924

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This is a collection of P.A. Brunt's writings on Greek history and thought--some previously published in journals and others unpublished until now. Subjects covered include Greek political history of the fifth century B.C. and ancient historiography--including an introduction to Thucydides designed for the more general reader, to which the author has now annexed a new study of Thucydides' funeral speech. Four essays concern the relationship between Greek philosophical thinking and social and political conditions, and of these, three, which constitute about a third of the volume, are new. Two examine the extent to which Plato and his pupils sought, or were able, to make any impact on the contemporary world, and the practicality of the model city in Plato's Laws; the third discusses Aristotle's theory of slavery in relation to the actual Greek institution and to other attempts to justify slavery as well as in the context of Aristotle's own ethical doctrines.