The Greatest Works of Scottish Literature

The Greatest Works of Scottish Literature

Author: Robert Louis Stevenson

Publisher: DigiCat

ISBN: EAN:8596547404149

Category: Fiction

Page: 15245

View: 660

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This unique and meticulously edited collection includes the greatest historical novels, adventure classics, legends, romance novels and war stories set in Scottish highlands and moors. Contents: Robert Louis Stevenson: Kidnapped Catriona Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses The Master of Ballantrae: A Winter's Tale Weir of Hermiston Walter Scott: Waverley Guy Mannering The Antiquary Rob Roy Ivanhoe Kenilworth The Pirate The Fortunes of Nigel Peveril of the Peak Quentin Durward St. Ronan's Well Redgauntlet Woodstock The Fair Maid of Perth Anne of Geierstein Old Mortality The Black Dwarf The Heart of Midlothian The Bride of Lammermoor A Legend of Montrose Count Robert of Paris Castle Dangerous The Monastery The Abbot The Betrothed The Talisman John Buchan: The Thirty-Nine Steps The Three Hostages Huntingtower Castle Gay The Power-House John Macnab Sir Quixote of the Moors John Burnet of Barns A Lost Lady of Old Years The Half-Hearted Salute to Adventurers Midwinter Witch Wood The Free Fishers O. Douglas: Olivia in India The Setons Penny Plain Ann and Her Mother Pink Sugar The Proper Place The Day of Small Things Priorsford Taken by the Hand Jane's Parlour The House That Is Our Own George MacDonald: David Elginbrod Alec Forbes of Howglen Robert Falconer Ranald Bannerman's Boyhood What's Mine's Mine The Elect Lady Heather and Snow Salted with Fire Malcolm The Marquis of Lossie Sir Gibbie Donal Grant J. M. Barrie: Auld Licht Idylls A Window in Thrums The Little Minister Sentimental Tommy Tommy and Grizel

Scotland's Books

Scotland's Books

Author: Robert Crawford

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: UOM:39076002783392

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 846

View: 863

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From Treasure Island to Trainspotting, Scotland's rich literary tradition has influenced writing across centuries and cultures far beyond its borders. Here, for the first time, is a single volume presenting the glories of fifteen centuries of Scottish literature. In Scotland's Books the much loved poet Robert Crawford tells the story of Scottish imaginative writing and its relationship to the country's history. Stretching from the medieval masterpieces of St. Columba's Iona - the earliest surviving Scottish work - to the energetic world of twenty-first-century writing by authors such as Ali Smith and James Kelman, this outstanding account traces the development of literature in Scotland and explores the cultural, linguistic and literary heritage of the nation. It includes extracts from the writing discussed to give a flavor of the original work, and its new research ranges from specially made translations of ancient poems to previously unpublished material from the Scottish Enlightenment and interviews with living writers. Informative and readable, this is the definitive single-volume guide to the marvelous legacy of Scottish literature.

Edinburgh History of Scottish Literature: From Columba to the Union (until 1707)

Edinburgh History of Scottish Literature: From Columba to the Union (until 1707)

Author: Ian Brown

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748628629

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 101

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The History begins with the first full-scale critical consideration of Scotland's earliest literature, drawn from the diverse cultures and languages of its early peoples. The first volume covers the literature produced during the medieval and early modern period in Scotland, surveying the riches of Scottish work in Gaelic, Welsh, Old Norse, Old English and Old French, as well as in Latin and Scots. New scholarship is brought to bear, not only on imaginative literature, but also law, politics, theology and philosophy, all placed in the context of the evolution of Scotland's geography, history, languages and material cultures from our earliest times up to 1707.

Sibling Rivalry: The Greatest Works by John Buchan & Anna Buchan

Sibling Rivalry: The Greatest Works by John Buchan & Anna Buchan

Author: John Buchan

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: EAN:4064066308513

Category: Fiction

Page: 5955

View: 393

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Musaicum Books present to you the collection of the greatest works by John Buchan and his sister Anna Buchan. John is mostly known by his spy thrillers and action novels, and Anna by her vivid portrayal of life and characters of the Scottish small towns and villages. Even though the legacy of the Buchan Family's Pen is very different in genre and theme, they both shared the common writing approach which was to write based on their life experience, to become inspired by the people they knew. Through their stories they brought to life the complex, courageous and tenacious people they got to know. Through their work they left us the testimony of the biggest shift in 20th century - the time of peace, happiness and naivety and the time of peril which destroyed forever their way of life after World War I. Contents: John Buchan: The Thirty-Nine Steps The Three Hostages Huntingtower Castle Gay The Power-House John Macnab Sir Quixote of the Moors John Burnet of Barns A Lost Lady of Old Years The Half-Hearted Salute to Adventurers Midwinter Witch Wood The Free Fishers Memory Hold-the-door – An Autobiography Anna Buchan: Olivia in India The Setons Penny Plain Ann and Her Mother Pink Sugar The Proper Place The Day of Small Things Priorsford Taken by the Hand Jane's Parlour The House That Is Our Own Unforgettable, Unforgotten – A Memoir

The Poetics of Space and Place in Scottish Literature

The Poetics of Space and Place in Scottish Literature

Author: Monika Szuba

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030126452

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 637

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This book addresses the poetics of space and place in Scottish literature. Focusing chiefly on twentieth- and twenty-first century texts, with acknowledgement of historical and philosophical contexts, the essays address representation, narrative form, the work of the poetic, perception and experience. Major genres and forms are discussed, and authors as diverse as George Mackay Brown, Kathleen Jamie, Ken McLeod and Kei Miller are presented through theoretically informed, historically contextualized close readings. Additionally considering the role of dialect and region in the poetry and fiction of modern Scotland, the volume argues for an appreciation of the cultural diversity of Scottish writers while highlighting the overarching presence of a connection between self and world, subject and place within Scottish literature.

Prizing Scottish Literature

Prizing Scottish Literature

Author: Stevie Marsden

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN: 9781785274831

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 189

View: 325

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This cultural history of the Saltire Society Literary Awards demonstrates the significance the awards have had within Scottish literary and cultural life. It is one piece of the wider cultural award puzzle and illustrates how, far from being parochial or niche, lesser-known awards, whose histories may be yet untold, play their own role in the circulation of cultural value through the consecration of literary value. The study of the Society’s Book of the Year and First Book of the Year Awards not only highlights how important connections between literary awards and national culture and identity are within prize culture and how literary awards, and their founding institutions, can be products of the socio-political and cultural milieu in which they form, but this study also illustrates how existing literary award scholarship has only begun to scratch the surface of the complexities of the phenomenon. This book promotes a new approach to considering literary prizes, proposing that the concept of the literary awards hierarchy can contribute to emerging and developing discourses pertaining to literary, and indeed cultural, prizes more broadly.

The Mainstream Companion to Scottish Literature

The Mainstream Companion to Scottish Literature

Author: Trevor Royle

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781780574196

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 338

View: 492

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The Mainstream Companion to Scottish Literature is the most comprehensive reference guide to Scotland's literature, covering a period from the earliest times to the early 1990s. It includes over 600 essays on the lives and works of the principal poets, novelists, dramatists critics and men and women of letters who have written in English, Scots or Gaelic. Thus, as well as such major writers as Robert Henryson, William Dunbar, Gavin Douglas, Allan Ramsay, Robert Fergusson, Robert Burns, Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson and Hugh MacDiarmid, the Companion also lists many minor writers whose work might otherwise have been overlooked in any survey of Scottish literature. Also included here are entries on the lives of other more peripheral writers such as historians, philosophers, diarists and divines whose work has made a contribution to Scottish letters. Other essays range over such general subjects as the principal work of major writers, literary movements, historical events, the world of printing and publishing, folklore, journalism, drama and Gaelic. A feature of the book is the inclusion of the bibliography of each writer and reference to the major critical works. This comprehensive guide is an essential tool for the serious student of Scottish literature as well as being an ideal guide and companion for the general reader.

Anglo-Scottish Literary Relations 1430-1550

Anglo-Scottish Literary Relations 1430-1550

Author: G. C. Kratzmann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521226653

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 298

View: 122

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This book is a study of Anglo-Scottish literary relations in the later Middle Ages and early Renaissance. It attempts to show how those poets who have frequently been called 'Scottish Chaucerians' (James I, Henryson, Dunbar and Douglas) drew upon English writing. In the best Middle Scots poetry we see an order of invention and technical mastery that is comparable with that of Chaucer's work, and this is sometimes accompanied by shrewd commentary on Chaucer's art. Evidence of such an independent and critical view of Chaucer is strikingly absent in contemporary English poetry, and the book accounts for some of the differences between Northern and Southern poetry in the later Middle Ages. Above all, this study reveals that the poetry of the fifteenth and early sixteenth century in Scotland is a rich and extremely varied body of literature, ranging from the carefully wrought philosophical comedy of 'The Kingis Quair' to the tragic grandeur of Henryson's 'The Testament of Cresseid', from the pointed satires and grotesqueries of Dunbar to Douglas' vigorous and sensitive translation of the Aeneid.

The Oxford Handbook of English Prose 1500-1640

The Oxford Handbook of English Prose 1500-1640

Author: Andrew Hadfield

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191655074

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 768

View: 273

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The Oxford Handbook of English Prose 1500-1640 is the only current overview of early modern English prose writing. The aim of the volume is to make prose more visible as a subject and as a mode of writing. It covers a vast range of material vital for the understanding of the period: from jestbooks, newsbooks, and popular romance to the translation of the classics and the pioneering collections of scientific writing and travel writing; from diaries, tracts on witchcraft, and domestic conduct books to rhetorical treatises designed for a courtly audience; from little known works such as William Baldwin's Beware the Cat, probably the first novel in English, to The Bible, The Book of Common Prayer and Richard Hooker's eloquent statement of Anglican belief, The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity. The work not only deals with the range and variety of the substance and types of English prose, but also analyses the forms and styles of writing adopted in the early modern period, ranging from the Euphuistic nature of prose fiction inaugurated by John Lyly's mannered novel, to the aggressive polemic of the Marprelate controversy; from the scatological humour of comic writing to the careful modulations of the most significant sermons of the age; and from the pithy and concise English essays of Francis Bacon to the ornate and meandering style of John Florio's translation of Montaigne's famous collection. Each essay provides an overview as well as comment on key passages, and a select guide to further reading.