The Course of Irish History

The Course of Irish History

Author: T. W. Moody

Publisher: Roberts Rinehart Pub

ISBN: UOM:39076001510713

Category: History

Page: 504

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A comprehensive history of Ireland, complemented by numerous photographs and line drawings, illuminates--from prehistoric times to the present attempts at peace in Northern Ireland--the complete history of the land and its people. IP.

Phases of Irish History

Phases of Irish History

Author: Eoin Mac Neill

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN: EAN:4064066201968

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 315

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"Phases of Irish History" by Eoin Mac Neill. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

The Irish

The Irish

Author: Robert E. Kennedy

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520308510

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 434

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This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1973.

Plural Identities - Singular Narratives

Plural Identities - Singular Narratives

Author: Máiréad Nic Craith

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781782381662

Category: Political Science

Page: 248

View: 462

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Northern Ireland is frequently characterized in terms of a "two traditions" paradigm, representing the conflict as being between two discrete cultures. Proceeding from an analysis of the historical and religious context, this study demonstrates the reductionist nature of the "two traditions" model, highlighting instead the complexity of ethnic identities and cultural traditions. It thus shows why attempts at reconciliation like the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, which seeks to promote the concept of a "parity of esteem" based on this identity model., are fraught with difficulties. Reflecting on the applicability of the concept of multiculturalism in the context of Northern Ireland, the author proposes a re-conceptualisation of Northern Irish culture along lines that steer clear of binary oppositions. From the Contents: 'Webs of Significance'; Dis-membering the Past; Divided by Common Cosmologies; A Discourse in Difference; The Process if 'Cruthinitude'; Un Unclaimed Tradition; Ethnic Nationality; The 'Fuzzy Frontier'; The 'Common Ground'

Ireland

Ireland

Author: Joseph Coohill

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781780745367

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 610

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From the first prehistoric inhabitants of the island to the St Andrews Agreement and decommissioning of IRA weapons, this uniquely concise account of Ireland and its people reveals how differing interpretations of history, ancient and modern, have influenced modern Irish society. Combining factual information with a critical approach, Coohill covers all the key events, including the Great Famine, Home Rule, and the Good Friday Agreement. Updated with two new chapters expanding the discussion of pre-modern Ireland, as well as developments in the 21st century, this highly accessible and balanced account will continue to provide a valuable resource to all those wishing to acquaint themselves further with the complex identity of the Irish people.

Medieval Ireland (New Gill History of Ireland 1)

Medieval Ireland (New Gill History of Ireland 1)

Author: Michael Richter

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN: 9780717165759

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 573

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Medieval Ireland – The Enduring Tradition, the first instalment in the New Gill History of Ireland series, offers an overview of Irish history from the coming of Christianity in the fifth century to the Reformation in the sixteenth, concentrating on Ireland’s cultural and social life and highlighting Irish society’s inherent stability in an very unstable period. Such a broad survey reveals features otherwise not easily detected. For all the complexity of political developments, Irish society remained basically stable and managed to withstand the onslaught of both the Vikings and the English. The inherent strength of Ireland consisted in the cultural heritage from pre-historic times, which remained influential throughout the centuries discussed in Professor Michael Richter’s engaging and informative book. Irish history has traditionally been described either in isolation or in the manner in which it was influenced by outside forces, especially by England. This book strikes a different balance. First, the time span covered is longer than usual, and more attention is paid to the early medieval centuries than to the later period. Secondly, less emphasis is placed in this book on the political or military history of Ireland than on general social and cultural aspects. As a result, a more mature interpretation of medieval Ireland emerges, one in which social and cultural norms inherited from pre-historic times are seen to survive right through the Middle Ages. They gave Irish society a stability and inherent strength unparalleled in Europe. Christianity came in as an additional, enriching factor. Medieval Ireland: Table of Contents The Celts Part I. Early Ireland (before c. AD 500) Ireland in Prehistoric Times Political Developments in Early Times Part II Ireland in the First Part of the Middle Ages (c. AD 500-1100) The Beginnings of Christianity in Ireland The Formation of the Early Irish Church Christian Ireland in the Seventh and Eighth Centuries Secularisation and Reform in the Eighth Centuries The Age of the Vikings Part III. Ireland in the Second part of the Middle Ages (c.1100-1500) Ireland under Foreign Influence: The Twelfth Century Ireland from the Reign of John to the Statutes of Kilkenny The End of the Middle Ages The Enduring Tradition

Irish Historical Documents Since 1800

Irish Historical Documents Since 1800

Author: Alan O'Day

Publisher: Savage, Md. : Barnes & Noble Books

ISBN: 0389209716

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 132

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Irish Historical Documents Since 1800 is another addition to Gill and Macmillan's well established reference publishing in Irish Studies, which already includes successful and widely acclaimed volumes in history, biography and literature. The book reproduces the texts of the most important documents and speeches in the course of Irish history from 1800 to the present day. Among the documents reproduced are the Ulster Solemn League and Covenant of 1912 which formed the basis of the Ulster Unionist resistance to Home Rule, a campaign which eventually resulted in the establishment of Northern Ireland; the Proclamation of the Republic of Ireland at the time of the Easter Rebellion of 1916; the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1922; the manifesto of the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association of 1968; and the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985. In addition to these major texts, the book will also contain material such as the Fenian proclamation of 1867; letters from lords lieutenant and other government officials in the nineteenth century; and contemporary documents from the Famine which tell graphically of the human and social cost of that huge tragedy. Irish Historical Documents Since 1800 is an essential reference tool for all students and researchers in modern Irish history.

Ireland's Mysterious Lands and Sunken Cities

Ireland's Mysterious Lands and Sunken Cities

Author: Jon Douglas Singer

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1462841309

Category: History

Page: 106

View: 307

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The Emerald Isle of Ireland has inspired a vast number of legends about lost or sunken lands and cities. These legends predate Roman and Christian influences. This book examines the intriguing nature of these legends and reviews anthropological and geological evidence supporting them. Was these indeed a Tir-fo-Thuin, the Land Under Wave, a combination of the dead and a paradise? Reviewed in Ireland of the Welcomes , Vol. 50, No. 6, November - December 2001, p.54 by Mary OSullivan Stories of sunken cities, monasteries, churches and royal palaces are scattered hither and yon across the broad landscape of Irish folklore. The fishermen of Lough Neagh believe that their huge lake conceals the proud remains of palaces and temples more firmly than the inhabitants of Scotland accept the existence of the Lough Ness monster. Hy Brazil or Hy Breasail, the legendary sunken paradise island is, of course, somewhere off the western seaboard, and thanks to its frequent reappearances on the surface, it persists on maps into the sixteenth century. The great Thomas Westropp reports personal sightings, one evening after sunset in 1887 off the Clare coast and again in 1910, this time on the Mayo coast! There are persistent stories of the image of a stately city clearly visible set in the sky above Galway bay, usually during spells of warm calm sunny weather`Come over next summer with an open mind. You never know your luck!