The Concept of Universal Crimes in International Law

The Concept of Universal Crimes in International Law

Author: Terje Einarsen

Publisher: Torkel Opsahl Academic EPublisher

ISBN: 9788293081333

Category: Law

Page: 361

View: 789

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This groundbreaking study seeks to clarify the concept of universal crimes in international law. It provides a new framework for understanding important features of this complex field of law concerned with the most serious crimes. Central issues include the following: What are the relevant crimes that may give rise to direct criminal liability under international law? Are they currently limited to certain core international crimes? Why should certain crimes be included whereas other serious offences should not? Should specific legal bases be considered more compelling than others for selection of crimes? Terje Einarsen (1960) is a judge at the Gulating High Court. He holds a Ph.D. (Doctor Juris) from the University of Bergen and a masters degree (LL.M.) from Harvard Law School.

Universal Jurisdiction under International Criminal Law. A Critical Analysis

Universal Jurisdiction under International Criminal Law. A Critical Analysis

Author: P. R. Ramdhass

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783668779471

Category: Law

Page: 168

View: 462

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Document from the year 2018 in the subject Law - Miscellaneous, , language: English, abstract: The concept of universal jurisdiction evolved out of protecting international commerce, but now it has become a necessity for protecting human values in modern times. Even though the concept is good, its misuse threatens peaceful international relations. The study propose to discuss the legal status of the concept of universal jurisdiction under international law and its conflict with other legal principles like State sovereignty, sovereign immunity and non-intervention. It will also highlight how jus cogens norms and obligatio erga omnes strengthen the concept of universal jurisdiction. Further, the study will discuss the related concepts, such as ‘responsibility to protect’ and ‘extradite or prosecute’. However, scope of the study will be limited to the problems of universal jurisdiction under international criminal law; and it will not address the issues of active, passive and territorial jurisdictions except to the extent necessary.

Universal Jurisdiction in International Criminal Law

Universal Jurisdiction in International Criminal Law

Author: Aisling O'Sullivan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0367075555

Category:

Page: 234

View: 189

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With the sensational arrest of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet in 1998, the rise to prominence of universal jurisdiction over crimes against international law seemed to be assured. The arrest of Pinochet and the ensuing proceedings before the UK courts brought universal jurisdiction into the foreground of the "fight against impunity" and the principle was read as an important complementary mechanism for international justice -one that could offer justice to victims denied an avenue by the limited jurisdiction of international criminal tribunals. Yet by the time of the International Court of Justice's Arrest Warrant judgment four years later, the picture looked much bleaker and the principle was being read as a potential tool for politically motivated trials. This book explores the debate over universal jurisdiction in international criminal law, aiming to unpack a practice in which international lawyers continue to disagree over the concept of universal jurisdiction. Using Martti Koskenniemi's work as a foil, this book exposes the argumentative techniques in operation in national and international adjudication since the 1990s. Drawing on overarching patterns within the debate, Aisling O'Sullivan argues that it is bounded by a tension between contrasting political preferences or positions, labelled as moralist ("ending impunity") and formalist ("avoiding abuse") and she reads the debate as a movement of hegemonic and counter-hegemonic positions that struggle for hegemonic control. However, she draws out how these positions (moralist/formalist) merge into one another and this produces a tendency towards a "middle" position that continues to prefer a particular preference (moralist or formalist). Aisling O'Sullivan then traces the transformation towards this tendency that reflects an internal split among international lawyers between building a utopia ("court of humanity") and recognizing its impossibility of being realized.

Crimes Against Humanity

Crimes Against Humanity

Author: Nergis Canefe

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN: 9781786837042

Category: Law

Page: 336

View: 960

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This volume considers how, based on the examination of cases pertaining to transitional justice settings that resort to local interpretations of crimes against humanity jurisprudence, fragmentation of international law and circumscribed applications of universal jurisdiction are necessary aspects of the grand enterprise to overcome the impasse of the tainted legacy of international criminal law in the Global South. If we are to proceed with adjudication of the most egregious and heinous crimes involving state criminality without facing the charge of neo-colonialist plotting, then we must reckon with localised and domesticated interpretations of international criminal law, rather than pursuing strict forms of legislative dictation of international criminal law.

International Criminal Law

International Criminal Law

Author: Roger O'Keefe

Publisher: Oxford International Law Libra

ISBN: 9780199689040

Category: Law

Page: 689

View: 959

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'International Criminal Law' presents a full and systematic overview of the field, placing it in the context of wider international law. It offers a high-level, analytical examination with particular reference to the concept of an international crime and the role of domestic courts in prosecuting international crimes.--

Routledge Handbook of International Criminal Law

Routledge Handbook of International Criminal Law

Author: William A. Schabas

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136866678

Category: Law

Page: 480

View: 600

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International criminal law has developed extraordinarily quickly over the last decade, with the creation of ad hoc tribunals in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, and the establishment of a permanent International Criminal Court. This book provides a timely and comprehensive survey of emerging and existing areas of international criminal law. The Handbook features new, specially commissioned papers by a range of international and leading experts in the field. It contains reflections on the theoretical aspects and contemporary debates in international criminal law. The book is split into four parts for ease of reference: The Historical and Institutional Framework – Sets international criminal law firmly in context with individual chapters on the important developments and key institutions which have been established. The Crimes – Identifies and analyses international crimes, including a chapter on aggression. The Practice of International Tribunals – Focuses on topics relating to the practice and procedure of international criminal law. Key Issues in International Criminal Law – Goes on to explore issues of importance such as universal jurisdiction, amnesties and international criminal law and human rights. Providing easy access to up-to-date and authoritative articles covering all key aspects of international criminal law, this book is an essential reference work for students, scholars and practitioners working in the field.

Universal Jurisdiction

Universal Jurisdiction

Author: Stephen Macedo

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812219503

Category: Law

Page: 398

View: 826

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Universal jurisdiction is becoming a potent instrument of international law, but it is poorly understood by legal experts and remains a mystery to most public officials and citizens.

A Theory of Punishable Participation in Universal Crimes

A Theory of Punishable Participation in Universal Crimes

Author: Terje Einarsen

Publisher: Torkel Opsahl Academic EPublisher

ISBN: 9788283481280

Category: Law

Page: 744

View: 426

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This study is the second in the four-part series entitled “Rethinking the Essentials of International Criminal Law and Transitional Justice”. While the first volume, The Concept of Universal Crimes in International Law, explored the parameters and theories related to crimes under international law, this book examines the notion of punishable participation in such crimes. It presents a general theory of personal criminal liability and provides a comprehensive overview of all forms of criminal participation in international law. The authors examine numerous primary materials in international and transnational criminal law, both historical and current, relating to both international and domestic jurisprudence. They also review academic literature that attempts to explain and bring consistency to the jurisprudence, as well as other sources such as reports of the International Law Commission. This rich empirical tapestry is then used to test and further develop an overarching conceptual theory and matrix that provides a better understanding of the boundaries of personal criminal liability lex lata and lex ferenda and of the relationship between the various forms of punishable participation in universal crimes. Like the first volume, this book makes a valuable contribution to a more coherent and practical understanding of international criminal law.

The Permanent International Criminal Court

The Permanent International Criminal Court

Author: Dominic McGoldrick

Publisher: Hart Publishing

ISBN: 9781841132815

Category: Law

Page: 517

View: 190

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This book examines the legal and policy issues involved in the establishment and functioning of the Permanent International Criminal Court.

The International Criminal Court as a Means to Realize Universal Human Rights

The International Criminal Court as a Means to Realize Universal Human Rights

Author: Ronja Maus

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783668410640

Category: Political Science

Page: 21

View: 706

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Seminar paper from the year 2015 in the subject Politics - International Politics - Topic: International Organisations, grade: 1,0, University of Tubingen, language: English, abstract: More than 10 years ago the International Criminal Court entered into force. It was designed to be a model of a global governing of human rights. Trying to set universal standards for the jurisdiction of human rights, it is the first time in human history, that serious human rights violations such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression can be judged in a court of law. The thesis will argue, that the ICC therefore presents a milestone on the realization of international human rights. However, the ICC has to face many obstacles, most prominently the opposition by several UN member states, who refuse to accede the Court. The thesis will illuminate this development with the help of some cosmopolitan approaches. The focus will be on the progress of universal human rights over the last centuries with the remarkable climax of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which also laid the roots for the later foundation of the ICC. In chapter 3 this thesis will broach the issue of the obstacles regarding the realization of human rights. As mentioned above, a major opposition still stems from the nation states, who are partly still stuck on a realist view of the international system. Out of fear, that they might lose sovereignty, they prefer to follow their national interest instead of putting universal human rights into practice. To explicate this behavior of nation states, I have consulted the article „In the national interest“, published by Allen Buchanan in 2005. He reflects on the observation that human rights are in practice in most of all cases incompatible with the national interest of a nation state. Although the majority of all states will commit themselves on paper to the noble goal of human rights promotion, in reality their foreign policy will quite often display quite the opposite. As a reply, I will argue with the help of David Held, that a cosmoplitan answer to overcome these obstacles is possible by creating common institutions as a new layer of legal competence to which people can transfer public powers. To illustrate these considerations I will then discuss the International Criminal Court, as an example of such a cosmopolitan institution.