The Cambridge History of Africa

The Cambridge History of Africa

Author: Roland Oliver

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521228034

Category: History

Page: 982

View: 125

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Volume VI covers the period 1870-1905, when the European powers divided the continent of Africa into colonial territories.

The Cambridge History of Africa

The Cambridge History of Africa

Author: J. D. Fage

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521224098

Category: History

Page: 1052

View: 273

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The eighth and final volume of The Cambridge History of Africa covers the period 1940-75. It begins with a discussion of the role of the Second World War in the political decolonisation of Africa. Its terminal date of 1975 coincides with the retreat of Portugal, the last European colonial power in Africa, from its possessions and their accession to independence. The fifteen chapters which make up this volume examine on both a continental and regional scale the extent to which formal transfer of political power by the European colonial rulers also involved economic, social and cultural decolonisation. A major theme of the volume is the way the African successors to the colonial rulers dealt with their inheritance and how far they benefited particular economic groups and disadvantaged others. The contributors to this volume represent different disciplinary traditions and do not share a single theoretical perspective on the recent history of the continent, a subject that is still the occasion for passionate debate.

The Cambridge History of South Africa

The Cambridge History of South Africa

Author: Robert Ross

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521869838

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 788

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This book surveys South African history from the discovery of gold in the Witwatersrand in the late nineteenth century to the first democratic elections in 1994. Written by many of the leading historians of the country, it pulls together four decades of scholarship to present a detailed overview of South Africa during the twentieth century. It covers political, economic, social, and intellectual developments and their interconnections in a clear and objective manner. This book, the second of two volumes, represents an important reassessment of all the major historical events, developments, and records of South Africa and will be an important new tool for students and professors of African history worldwide, as well as the basis for further development and research.