The Benefits of Spaceflight and Space Exploration

The Benefits of Spaceflight and Space Exploration

Author: Jason Porterfield

Publisher: Encyclopaedia Britannica

ISBN: 9781680486643

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

View: 491

Get eBOOK →
"For millennia, humanity has looked to the stars with wonder and longing. The dream of taking flight and exploring the solar system was realized in the 1950s, when the first satellites and manned orbital missions were launched. Humans continue to send scientific instruments, telescopes, and astronauts into space in an effort to learn more about the universe and about Earth. This book will explain the practical and scientific benefits of space exploration, from tracking climate change to global cooperation through shared research."

The Benefits of Spaceflight and Space Exploration

The Benefits of Spaceflight and Space Exploration

Author: Jason Porterfield

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 9781680486612

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 50

View: 590

Get eBOOK →
For millennia, humanity has looked to the stars with wonder and longing. The dream of taking flight and exploring the solar system was realized in the 1950s, when the first satellites and manned orbital missions were launched. Humans continue to send scientific instruments, telescopes, and astronauts into space in an effort to learn more about the universe and about Earth. This title will explain the practical and scientific benefits of space exploration, from tracking climate change to global cooperation through shared research.

Seeking a Human Spaceflight Program

Seeking a Human Spaceflight Program

Author: Human Spaceflight Human Spaceflight Plans Committee

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1502453975

Category:

Page: 154

View: 658

Get eBOOK →
The U.S. human spaceflight program appears to be on an unsustainable trajectory. It is perpetuating the perilous practice of pursuing goals that do not match allocated resources. Space operations are among the most demanding and unforgiving pursuits ever undertaken by humans. It really is rocket science. Space operations become all the more difficult when means do not match aspirations. Such is the case today. The nation is facing important decisions on the future of human spaceflight. Will we leave the close proximity of low- Earth orbit, where astronauts have circled since 1972, and explore the solar system, charting a path for the eventual expansion of human civilization into space? If so, how will we ensure that our exploration delivers the greatest benefit to the nation? Can we explore with reasonable assurances of human safety? Can the nation marshal the resources to embark on the mission? Whatever space program is ultimately selected, it must be matched with the resources needed for its execution. How can we marshal the necessary resources? There are actually more options available today than in 1961, when President Kennedy challenged the nation to "commit itself to the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth." First, space exploration has become a global enterprise. Many nations have aspirations in space, and the combined annual budgets of their space programs are comparable to NASA's. If the United States is willing to lead a global program of exploration, sharing both the burden and benefit of space exploration in a meaningful way, significant accomplishments could follow. Actively engaging international partners in a manner adapted to today's multi-polar world could strengthen geopolitical relationships, leverage global financial and technical resources, and enhance the exploration enterprise. Second, there is now a burgeoning commercial space industry. If we craft a space architecture to provide opportunities to this industry, there is the potential-not without risk-that the costs to the government would be reduced. Finally, we are also more experienced than in 1961, and able to build on that experience as we design an exploration program. If, after designing cleverly, building alliances with partners, and engaging commercial providers, the nation cannot afford to fund the effort to pursue the goals it would like to embrace, it should accept the disappointment of setting lesser goals. Can we explore with reasonable assurances of human safety? Human space travel has many benefits, but it is an inherently dangerous endeavor. Human safety can never be absolutely assured, but throughout this report, safety is treated as a sine qua non. It is not discussed in extensive detail because any concepts falling short in human safety have simply been eliminated from consideration. How will we explore to deliver the greatest benefit to the nation? Planning for a human spaceflight program should begin with a choice about its goals-rather than a choice of possible destinations. Destinations should derive from goals, and alternative architectures may be weighed against those goals. There is now a strong consensus in the United States that the next step in human spaceflight is to travel beyond low-Earth orbit. This should carry important benefits to society, including: driving technological innovation; developing commercial industries and important national capabilities; and contributing to our expertise in further exploration. Human exploration can contribute appropriately to the expansion of scientific knowledge, particularly in areas such as field geology, and it is in the interest of both science and human spaceflight that a credible and well-rationalized strategy of coordination between them be developed. Crucially, human spaceflight objectives should broadly align with key national objectives.

Space Exploration

Space Exploration

Author: Sarah Flowers

Publisher: Enslow Pub Incorporated

ISBN: 0766011992

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 70

View: 465

Get eBOOK →
Examines the debate over whether the United States should continue putting money into its space program.

The Politics and Perils of Space Exploration

The Politics and Perils of Space Exploration

Author: Linda Dawson

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030568351

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 272

View: 609

Get eBOOK →
This book examines the U.S. space program’s triumphs and failures in order to assess what constitutes a successful space policy. Using NASA and the space industry’s complex history as a guide, it draws global lessons about space missions and the trends we can expect from different nations in the next decade and beyond. Space exploration has become increasingly dependent on cooperation between countries as well as the involvement of private enterprise. This book thus addresses issues such as: Given their tenuous history, can rival countries work together? Can private enterprise fill NASA’s shoes and provide the same expertise and safety standards? Written by a former NASA Aerodynamics Officer at Houston Mission Control working on the Space Shuttle program, the second edition of this book provides updated information on U.S. space policy, including the new strategy to return to the Moon prior to traveling to Mars. Additionally, it takes a look at the formation of the Space Force as a military unit, as well as the latest developments in private industry. Overall, it is a thought-provoking resource for both space industry professionals and space enthusiasts.

Space Exploration in the United States: A Documentary History

Space Exploration in the United States: A Documentary History

Author: Thomas Gangale

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440871658

Category: Science

Page: 323

View: 456

Get eBOOK →
This select volume of historical documents is organized chronologically, spanning from 1914 to the present. Divided into eight chapters, it includes a narrative introduction to each historical period. Provides readers with a broad overview of the U.S. history of human spaceflight from its beginnings to the present, and of the early 20th century rocketry that preceded it Provides a basis for in-depth studies of more specific topics in U.S. space history via source documents Presents the technocratic and commercial development of space technology as a push-pull relationship in which each propels the other into the future

Pathways to Exploration

Pathways to Exploration

Author: National Research Council

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 9780309305105

Category: Science

Page: 279

View: 642

Get eBOOK →
The United States has publicly funded its human spaceflight program on a continuous basis for more than a half-century, through three wars and a half-dozen recessions, from the early Mercury and Gemini suborbital and Earth orbital missions, to the lunar landings, and thence to the first reusable winged crewed spaceplane that the United States operated for three decades. Today the United States is the major partner in a massive orbital facility - the International Space Station - that is becoming the focal point for the first tentative steps in commercial cargo and crewed orbital space flights. And yet, the long-term future of human spaceflight beyond this project is unclear. Pronouncements by multiple presidents of bold new ventures by Americans to the Moon, to Mars, and to an asteroid in its native orbit, have not been matched by the same commitment that accompanied President Kennedy\'s now fabled 1961 speech-namely, the substantial increase in NASA funding needed to make it happen. Are we still committed to advancing human spaceflight? What should a long-term goal be, and what does the United States need to do to achieve it? Pathways to Exploration explores the case for advancing this endeavor, drawing on the history of rationales for human spaceflight, examining the attitudes of stakeholders and the public, and carefully assessing the technical and fiscal realities. This report recommends maintaining the long-term focus on Mars as the horizon goal for human space exploration. With this goal in mind, the report considers funding levels necessary to maintain a robust tempo of execution, current research and exploration projects and the time/resources needed to continue them, and international cooperation that could contribute to the achievement of spaceflight to Mars. According to Pathways to Exploration, a successful U.S. program would require sustained national commitment and a budget that increases by more than the rate of inflation. In reviving a U.S. human exploration program capable of answering the enduring questions about humanity's destiny beyond our tiny blue planet, the nation will need to grapple with the attitudinal and fiscal realities of the nation today while staying true to a small but crucial set of fundamental principles for the conduct of exploration of the endless frontier. The recommendations of Pathways to Exploration provide a clear map toward a human spaceflight program that inspires students and citizens by furthering human exploration and discovery, while taking into account the long-term commitment necessary to achieve this goal.

Remembering the Space Age

Remembering the Space Age

Author: Steven J. Dick

Publisher: National Aeronautics & Space Admin

ISBN: MINN:30000008971339

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 486

View: 247

Get eBOOK →
From the Publisher: Proceedings of October 2007 conference, sponsored by the NASA History Division and the National Air and Space Museum, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Sputnik 1 launch in October 1957 and the dawn of the space age.