Rhode Island Shipwrecks

Rhode Island Shipwrecks

Author: Charlotte Taylor

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467125062

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 262

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Rhode Island, the Ocean State, has more shipwrecks per square mile than any other state. The south coast and Block Island are the resting places of many shipwrecks, with many more located in Narragansett Bay. The record of shipwrecks in Rhode Island begins immediately after the arrival of Europeans in the early 17th century with the grounding of a Dutch trading vessel, and thousands more vessels came to grief in its waters in the following centuries, through bad weather, human error, equipment failure, and military action. Some of these shipwrecks were epic disasters, with many fatalities and the total loss of the vessel; others were relatively minor misfortunes in which the ships were salvageable. Many shipwrecks from the 19th century on into the 20th were captured in the dramatic images gathered here. These pictures show the variety of vessels that travelled Rhode Island's waters back when the ocean was the primary transportation corridor and the many ways in which they met misfortune.

Rhode Island Disasters

Rhode Island Disasters

Author: Jim Ignasher

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781614232803

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 863

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How could a perfectly sound U.S. military fighter plane simply vanish from formation on a training flight? Why did the crew of a speeding train choose death over salvation? What really happened one foggy night in 1929 when the Coast Guard fired on a rumrunner in Narragansett Bay? Do guardian angels really exist? Can an airplane be jinxed? In his latest book, Jim Ignasher chronicles twenty-three long-forgotten tales of disaster in the Ocean State. His research includes declassified government reports, which allow for some stories to be told in their entirety for the first time. Collectively, these tales present heroes and villains, adventure and the human condition, strange happenings and unsolved mysteries.

The New England Mariner Tradition

The New England Mariner Tradition

Author: Robert A. Geake

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781625847041

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 580

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For over three centuries, New Englanders have set sail in search of fortune and adventure--yet death lurked on every voyage in the form of storms, privateers, disease and human error. In hope of being spared by the sea, superstitious mariners practiced cautionary rituals. During the winter of 1779, the crew aboard the "Family Trader" offered up gin to appease the squalling storms of Neptune. In the 1800s, after nearly fifty shipwrecks on Georges Bank between Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and Nova Scotia, a wizard paced the coast of Marblehead, shouting orders out to sea to guide passing ships to safety. As early as 1705, courageous settlers erected watch houses and lighted beacons at Beavertail Point outside Jamestown, Rhode Island, to aid mariners caught in the swells of Narragansett Bay. Join Robert A. Geake as he explores the forgotten traditions among New England mariners and their lives on land and sea.

Encyclopedia of Western Atlantic Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure

Encyclopedia of Western Atlantic Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure

Author: Victoria Sandz

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786429028

Category: Transportation

Page: 240

View: 608

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From aerial survey to zoology, Part I of this two-part encyclopedia covers all aspects of underwater archeology, treasure hunting and salvaging. For example, entries are included for different types of artifacts, notable treasure hunters, the various salvaging equipment, and techniques in mapping and excavating. Part II covers the shipwrecks themselves, dividing them into 13 geographical categories. Beginning with the northernmost category (Canada) and ending with the southernmost (South America), every known shipwreck--both identified and unidentified--receives an entry in alphabetical order under its appropriate geographical category. Entries are by name, such as Andrea Gail, Titanic, and Queen Ann's Revenge. Unidentified is used when a shipwreck's name remains unknown. Entries give the nationality (e.g., Spanish, British, American), type (schooner, frigate, brig are three), function (examples: slave transportation, piracy, fishing), location and history of the shipwreck.

Storms and Shipwrecks of New England

Storms and Shipwrecks of New England

Author: Edward Rowe Snow

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 9781933212210

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 645

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A classic by Edward Rowe Snow, updated by Jeremy D'Entremont, covering the pirate ship Whidah, the wreck of the City of Columbus, the Portland Gale, and the 1938 hurricane.

SHIPWRECKS FOR WALKERS VOL 1

SHIPWRECKS FOR WALKERS VOL 1

Author: TOM BENNETT

Publisher: TOM Bennett (Shipwreck Historian)

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 82

View: 231

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Every half mile of Britain's coastline has seen a shipwreck. It is not surprising that between the boulders or under the sand lie the remains of long lost ships. This book identifies and gives the stories of some 50 wrecks that can be seen at low water around the UK. Go shipwreck hunting on foot and explore Britain's maritime past.