Pericles Of Athens And The Birth Of Democracy

Pericles Of Athens And The Birth Of Democracy

Author: Donald Kagan

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780684863955

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 453

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"Kagan, faithful to his lifelong fascination with Pericles . . . gives us an accessible and invaluable account of his life and deeds."--Allan Bloom, author of "The Closing of the American Mind."

The Birth and Death of Athenian Democracy

The Birth and Death of Athenian Democracy

Author: Clara Rising

Publisher:

ISBN: 1401081630

Category: Fiction

Page: 507

View: 170

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From the peaceful summits of Delphi to the political turmoil that spawned democracy, the story of Athens becomes a paradigm, if not a photocopy predicting the history of western civilization. To understand Pericles, who lived its dreams, is a lesson in forbearance for our own time. Guts and imagination built "the glory that was Greece." Despite war and plague, defeat and disaster, an idea was born that is still the hope of mankind.

The Life and Times of Pericles

The Life and Times of Pericles

Author: Jim Whiting

Publisher: Mitchell Lane Publishers, Inc.

ISBN: 9781612288963

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

View: 852

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Greek soldiers defeated numerically superior Persian armies in several battles near the beginning of the fifth century BCE. That set the stage for what is known as the Golden Age of Greece, several decades of almost unparalleled accomplishments in art, politics, and civil affairs. The leader during this inspired era was a citizen of Athens named Pericles. He led many important political changes in the city. He was also largely responsible for the development of the Acropolis. Buildings such as the Parthenon still inspire awe and admiration among countless numbers of visitors to the site every year.

A Brief History of Liberty

A Brief History of Liberty

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 1942880014

Category:

Page: 138

View: 440

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This work traces Liberty from her emergence in ancient Athens to her "death" at the hands of Julius Caesar and his successors in the early Roman Empire. The author concludes that Liberty is bedeviled by a great paradox. Liberty is natural to mankind, yet is singularly difficult to bring into the world. It was a providential confluence of geography, culture, and happenstance that led to ancient Athens' being the site of the "birth" of democracy following a bloody, foiled coup attempt by Cylon of Athens. Pericles of Athens later gave the Tree of Liberty a place in which to take root and flourish. Solon and even the dreaded Draco also contributed mightily to Athens' rightful reputation of the birthplace of Liberty. Alexander the Great conquered ancient Greece and spread Greek culture throughout the known world. Following Alexander's untimely death, Rome absorbed much of the remaining empire, thus spreading Greek culture, including its philosophical and political teachings, ever-farther. As Rome lost touch with its own roots and culture, its corrupt and weakened foundations yielded to the Caesars, ending democracy in the classical world, and leaving Lady Liberty in search of new lands. As the author demonstrates, Liberty is both delicate and tenacious. She is hard to coax out into the world (and even then often at great cost in blood and treasure), yet is seemingly immortal. She emerges when the time and circumstances suit her nature, and only then will take her proper place in bestowing her considerable blessings on the affairs of mankind.

Lords of the Sea

Lords of the Sea

Author: John R. Hale

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101050859

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 266

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The epic true story of Themistocles and the Battle of Salamis, and a rousing history of the world's first dominant navy and the towering empire it built The Athenian Navy was one of the finest fighting forces in the history of the world. It engineered a civilization, empowered the world's first democracy, and led a band of ordinary citizens on a voyage of discovery that altered the course of history. With Lords of the Sea, renowned archaeologist John R. Hale presents, for the first time, the definitive history of the epic battles, the fearsome ships, and the men-from extraordinary leaders to seductive rogues-that established Athens's supremacy. With a scholar's insight and a storyteller's flair, Hale takes us on an unforgettable voyage with these heroes, their turbulent careers, and far-flung expeditions, bringing back to light a forgotten maritime empire and its majestic legacy.

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece

Author: Nigel Wilson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136787997

Category: History

Page: 832

View: 942

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Examining every aspect of the culture from antiquity to the founding of Constantinople in the early Byzantine era, this thoroughly cross-referenced and fully indexed work is written by an international group of scholars. This Encyclopedia is derived from the more broadly focused Encyclopedia of Greece and the Hellenic Tradition, the highly praised two-volume work. Newly edited by Nigel Wilson, this single-volume reference provides a comprehensive and authoritative guide to the political, cultural, and social life of the people and to the places, ideas, periods, and events that defined ancient Greece.

The Peloponnesian War

The Peloponnesian War

Author: Donald Kagan

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 9780007115068

Category: Greece

Page: 511

View: 576

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The classical scholar takes a new look at the war between Athens and Sparta, examining the conflict that devastated Ancient Greece in the fifth century B.C.E.

Empire and the Ends of Politics

Empire and the Ends of Politics

Author: Plato

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9781585105236

Category: Philosophy

Page: 64

View: 874

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This text brings together for the first time two complete key works from classical antiquity on the politics of Athens: Plato's Menexenus and Pericles' funeral oration (from Thucydides' history of the Peloponnesian War).

Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece

Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece

Author: Kurt A. Raaflaub

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520258099

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 912

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"A balanced, high-quality analysis of the developing nature of Athenian political society and its relationship to 'democracy' as a timeless concept."—Mark Munn, author of The School of History

Athenian Democracy: A Sourcebook

Athenian Democracy: A Sourcebook

Author: Luca Asmonti

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781441165312

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 986

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This volume presents a wide range of literary and epigraphic sources on the history of the world's first democracy, offering a comprehensive survey of the key themes and principles of Athenian democratic culture. Beginning with the mythical origins of Athenian democracy under Theseus and describing the historical development of Athens' democratic institutions through Solon's reforms to the birth of democracy under Cleisthenes, the book addresses the wider cultural and social repercussions of the democratic system, concluding with a survey of Athenian democracy in the Hellenistic and Roman age. All sources are presented in translation with full annotation and commentary and each chapter opens with an introduction to provide background and direction for readers. Sources include material by Aristotle, Homer, Aristophanes, Herodotus, Thucydides, Cicero, Tacitus and many others. The volume also includes an A-Z of key terms, an annotated bibliography with suggestions for further reading in the primary sources as well as modern critical works on Athenian democracy, and a full index.

Democracy

Democracy

Author: Paul Cartledge

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191079177

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 477

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Democracy is either aspired to as a goal or cherished as a birthright by billions of people throughout the world today — and has been been for over a century. But what does it mean? And how has its meaning changed since it was first coined in ancient Greece? Democracy: A Life is a biography of the concept, looking at its many different manifestations and showing how it has changed over its long life, from ancient times right through to the present. For instance, how did the 'people power' of the Athenians emerge in the first place? Once it had emerged, what enabled it to survive? And how did the Athenian version of democracy differ from the many other forms that developed among the myriad cities of the Greek world? Paul Cartledge answers all these questions and more, following the development of ancient political thinking about democracy from the sixth century BC onwards, not least the many arguments that were advanced against it over the centuries. As Cartledge shows, after a golden age in the fourth century BC, there was a long, slow degradation of the original Greek conception and practice of democracy, from the Hellenistic era, through late Republican and early Imperial Rome, down to early Byzantium in the sixth century CE. For many centuries after that, from late Antiquity, through the Middle Ages, to the Renaissance, democracy was effectively eclipsed by other forms of government, in both theory and practice. But as we know, this was by no means the end of the story. For democracy was eventually to enjoy a re-florescence, over two thousand years after its first flowering in the ancient world: initially revived in seventeenth-century England, it was to undergo a further renaissance in the revolutionary climate of late-eighteenth-century North America and France — and has been constantly reconstituted and reinvented ever since.

Pericles of Athens

Pericles of Athens

Author: Vincent Azoulay

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691178332

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 312

View: 263

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Pericles has the rare distinction of giving his name to an entire period of history, embodying what has often been taken as the golden age of the ancient Greek world. “Periclean” Athens witnessed tumultuous political and military events, and achievements of the highest order in philosophy, drama, poetry, oratory, and architecture. Pericles of Athens is the first book in decades to reassess the life and legacy of one of the greatest generals, orators, and statesmen of the classical world. In this compelling critical biography, Vincent Azoulay takes a fresh look at both the classical and modern reception of Pericles, recognizing his achievements as well as his failings. From Thucydides and Plutarch to Voltaire and Hegel, ancient and modern authors have questioned Pericles’s relationship with democracy and Athenian society. This is the enigma that Azoulay investigates in this groundbreaking book. Pericles of Athens offers a balanced look at the complex life and afterlife of the legendary “first citizen of Athens.”