Paul Ehrlich's Receptor Immunology

Paul Ehrlich's Receptor Immunology

Author: Arthur M. Silverstein

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780080538518

Category: Medical

Page: 202

View: 318

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Paul Ehrlich's Receptor Immunology: The Magnificent Obsession describes the background to Paul Ehrlich's immunological works and theories and delves into the substance of his experiments in great detail. By exploring these early developments in immunology, the book lays the foundation for modern concepts, providing immunologists, biomedical researchers, and students the context for the discoveries in their field. The selectionist theory of antibody formation Kinetics of primary and secondary antibody response Quantitative methods of measurement of antigens and antibody Demonstration of passive transfer of immunity from mother to foetus

A History of Immunology

A History of Immunology

Author: Arthur M. Silverstein

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780080925837

Category: Medical

Page: 422

View: 931

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This is a professional-level intellectual history of the development of immunology from about 1720 to about 1970. Beginning with the work and insights of the early immunologists in the 18th century, Silverstein traces the development of the major ideas which have formed immunology down to the maturation of the discipline in the decade following the Second World War. Emphasis is placed on the philosophic and sociologic climate of the scientific milieu in which immunology has developed, providing a background to the broad culture of the discipline. A professional-level intellectual history of the development of immunology from about 1720 to 1970, with emphasis placed on the social climate of the scientific milieu in which modern immunology evolved Written by an author very well known both as a historian of medical science and for his substantial research contributions to the immunopathology of the eye The only complete history of immunology available

Immunity

Immunity

Author: Luba Vikhanski

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 9781613731130

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 295

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Around Christmas of 1882, while peering through a microscope at starfish larvae in which he had inserted tiny thorns, Russian zoologist Elie Metchnikoff had a brilliant insight: what if the mobile cells he saw gathering around the thorns were nothing but a healing force in action? Metchnikoff's daring theory of immunity—that voracious cells he called phagocytes formed the first line of defense against invading bacteria—would eventually earn the scientist a Nobel Prize, shared with his archrival, as well as the unofficial moniker "Father of Natural Immunity." But first he had to win over skeptics, especially those who called his theory "an oriental fairy tale." Using previously inaccessible archival materials, author Luba Vikhanski chronicles Metchnikoff's remarkable life and discoveries in the first moder n biography of this hero of medicine. Metchnikoff was a towering figure in the scientific community of the early twentieth century, a tireless humanitarian who, while working at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, also strived to curb the spread of cholera, syphilis, and other deadly diseases. In his later years, he startled the world with controversial theories on longevity, launching a global craze for yogurt, and pioneered research into gut microbes and aging. Though Metchnikoff was largely forgotten for nearly a hundred years, Vikhanski documents a remarkable revival of interest in his ideas on immunity and on the gut flora in the science of the twenty-first century.

Emil Von Behring

Emil Von Behring

Author: Derek S. Linton

Publisher: American Philosophical Society

ISBN: 0871692554

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 580

View: 113

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In 1901 Emil von Behring received the first Nobel Prize in medicine for serum therapy against diphtheria, a disease that killed thousands of infants annually. Diphtheria serum was the first major cure of the bacteriological era & its development generated novel procedures for testing, standardizing, & regulating drugs. Since the intro. of antibiotics, Behring & his work have largely been forgotten. In the first English-language scientific biography of Behring, Derek S. Linton seeks to restore Behring's reputation. He emphasizes Behring's seminal contributions to the study of infectious disease, the formation of modern immunology, & innovative research on specific remedies & vaccines against deadly microbial infections. Behring's research program is placed within the context of Imperial Germany's vibrant scientific culture. This biography explores his complex relations to the rival bacteriological schools of Robert Koch in Berlin & Louis Pasteur in Paris, the emergent German pharmaceutical industry, & the institutionalization of experimental therapeutic research. It also analyzes Behring's collaborations & controversies with leading med. researchers. The second part of the volume contains translations of 13 key articles by Behring & his associates on infectious diseases, immunology, drug testing, & therapeutics spanning 30 years of his remarkable scientific career.

Evaluating and Standardizing Therapeutic Agents, 1890-1950

Evaluating and Standardizing Therapeutic Agents, 1890-1950

Author: C. Gradmann

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230285590

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 229

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Following the testing of therapeutic sera, the quantified evaluation of a pharmaceutical's efficacy became a key feature of medicine in the twentieth century. The case studies in this volume offer comparisons across Europe, from the diphtheria antitoxin in the late 1800s to the introduction of the Salk polio vaccine in the 1950s.

Networks in Tropical Medicine

Networks in Tropical Medicine

Author: Deborah Neill

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804781053

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 727

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Networks in Tropical Medicine explores how European doctors and scientists worked together across borders to establish the new field of tropical medicine in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The book shows that this transnational collaboration in a context of European colonialism, scientific discovery, and internationalism shaped the character of the new medical specialty. Even in an era of intense competition among European states, practitioners of tropical medicine created a transnational scientific community through which they influenced each other and the health care that was introduced to the tropical world. One of the most important developments in the shaping of tropical medicine as a specialty was the major sleeping sickness epidemic that spread across sub-Saharan Africa at the turn of the century. The book describes how scientists and doctors collaborated across borders to control, contain, and find a treatment for the disease. It demonstrates that these medical specialists' shared notions of "Europeanness," rooted in common beliefs about scientific, technological, and racial superiority, led them to establish a colonial medical practice in Africa that sometimes oppressed the same people it was created to help.

Five Quarts

Five Quarts

Author: Bill B. Hayes

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN: 9780345482150

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 604

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“We’re born in blood. Our family histories are contained in it, our bodies nourished by it daily. Five quarts run through each of us, along some sixty thousand miles of arteries, veins, and capillaries.” –from Five Quarts In the national bestseller Sleep Demons, Bill Hayes took us on a trailblazing trip through the night country of insomnia. Now he is our guide on a whirlwind journey through history, literature, mythology, and science by means of the great red river that runs five quarts strong through our bodies. Profusely illustrated, the journey stretches from ancient Rome, where gladiators drank the blood of vanquished foes to gain strength and courage, to modern-day laboratories, where high-tech machines test blood for diseases and dedicated scientists search for elusive cures. Along the way, there will be world-changing triumphs: William Harvey’s discovery of the circulation of the blood; Antoni van Leeuwenhoek’s advances in making the invisible world visible in the early days of the microscope; Dr. Paul Ehrlich’s Nobel-Prize-winning work in immunology; Dr. Jay Levy’s codiscovery of the virus that causes AIDS. Yet there will also be ignorance and tragedy: the widespread practice of bloodletting via incision and the use of leeches, which harmed more than it healed; the introduction of hemophilia into the genetic pool of nineteenth-century European royalty thanks to the dynastic ambitions of Queen Victoria; the alleged spread of contaminated blood through a phlebotomist’s negligence in modern-day California. This is also a personal voyage, in which Hayes recounts the impact of the vital fluid in his daily life, from growing up in a household of five sisters and their monthly cycles, to coming out as a gay man during the explosive early days of the AIDS epidemic in San Francisco, to his enduring partnership with an HIV-positive man. As much a biography of blood as it is a memoir of how this rich substance has shaped one man’s life, Five Quarts is by turns whimsical and provocative, informative and moving. It will get under your skin.

A Short History of the Drug Receptor Concept

A Short History of the Drug Receptor Concept

Author: C. Prüll

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230583740

Category: Science

Page: 239

View: 416

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The concept of specific receptors for drugs, hormones and transmitters lies at the very heart of biomedicine. This book is the first to consider the idea from its 19th century origins in the work of John Newport Langley and Paul Ehrlich, to its development of during the 20th century and its current impact on drug discovery in the 21st century.

War and Disease

War and Disease

Author: Leo Barney Slater

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813544380

Category: Medical

Page: 266

View: 508

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Fighting around the globe, American soldiers were at high risk for contracting malaria, yet quinine - a natural cure - became hard to acquire. This historical study shows the roots and branches of an enormous drug development project during World War II.

Biomedicine in the Twentieth Century

Biomedicine in the Twentieth Century

Author: Caroline Hannaway

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN: 9781586038328

Category: Medical

Page: 389

View: 871

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." . . based on a conference that was held at the National Institutes of Health in December 2005 to promote historical research on biomedical science in the twentieth century"--p. ix.

Perspectives on Twentieth-century Pharmaceuticals

Perspectives on Twentieth-century Pharmaceuticals

Author: Viviane Quirke

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 3039109200

Category: Medical

Page: 500

View: 239

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One of the most striking features of the twentieth century has been the rapid growth of the pharmaceutical industry and the large increases in the use and consumption of its products. This trend began in the first half of the century, but accelerated most sharply after the Second World War, when the creation of national systems of healthcare created mass markets for drugs. The industry then assumed a major economic, social and political significance, and became one of the most highly regulated sectors of the economy, attracting the attention of industry analysts as well as academics. This volume brings together a collection of papers exploring and reflecting upon some of the significant strands in the current studies of pharmaceuticals in the twentieth century. They touch upon many of the issues that are matters of concern and debate today, and their international and multidisciplinary approaches enrich our understanding of an object, of an industry, and of a process that are at the heart of our highly medicalized contemporary societies.