Nonviolence in Political Theory

Nonviolence in Political Theory

Author: Iain Atack

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748633791

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 196

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Develops a coherent theory of nonviolent political action in the context of Western political theory. Ian Atack identifies the contribution of nonviolence to political theory through connecting central characteristics of nonviolent action to fundamental debates about the role of power and violence in politics. This in turn provides a platform for going beyond historical and strategic accounts of nonviolence to a deeper understanding of its transformative potential.From Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King to toppled communist regimes in Eastern Europe and pro-democracy movements in Serbia, Georgia and Ukraine, nonviolent action has played a significant role in achieving social and political change in the last century. The Arab Spring revolutions, particularly those in Tunisia and Egypt, and the Occupy movement in the US and UK demonstrate that nonviolence continues to be a vital feature of many campaigns for democracy, human rights and social justice.

Nonviolence in Political Theory

Nonviolence in Political Theory

Author: Iain Atack

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748649679

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 286

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By scrutinising the philosophical and theoretical assumptions of proponents of nonviolent political action, for example the role of the state, the rule of law and the nature of social and political power, Ian Atack establishes nonviolence as a credible th

Reconstructing Nonviolence

Reconstructing Nonviolence

Author: Roberto Baldoli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351372602

Category: Political Science

Page: 172

View: 317

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Nonviolent methods of action have been a powerful tool since the early twentieth century for social protest and revolutionary social and political change, and there is diffuse awareness that nonviolence is an efficient spontaneous choice of movements, individuals and whole nations. Yet from a conceptual standpoint, nonviolence struggles to engage with key contemporary political issues: the role of religion in a post-secular world; the crisis of democracy; and the use of supposedly ‘nonviolent techniques’ for violent aims. Drawing on classic thinkers and contemporary authors, in particular the Italian philosopher Aldo Capitini, this book shows that nonviolence is inherently a non-systematic and flexible system with no pure, immaculate thought at its core. Instead, at the core of nonviolence there is praxis, which is impure because while it aims at freedom and plurality it is made of less than perfect actions performed in an imperfect environment by flawed individuals. Offering a more progressive, transformative and at the same time pluralistic concept of nonviolence, this book is an original conceptual analysis of political theory which will appeal to students of international relations, global politics, security studies, peace studies and democratic theory.

Exploring the Power of Nonviolence

Exploring the Power of Nonviolence

Author: Elavie Ndura

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815652533

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 316

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The new millennium finds humanity situated at critical crossroads. While there are many hopeful signs of cross-cultural engagement and democratic dialogue, it is equally the case that the challenges of warfare and injustice continue to plague nations and communities around the globe. Against this backdrop, there exists a powerful mechanism for transforming crises into opportunities: the philosophy and practice of nonviolence. The expert authors brought together in this volume collectively deploy the essential teachings of nonviolence across a spectrum of contemporary issues. From considering the principles of the French Revolution and encouraging peace through natural resource management to exploring multiculturism and teaching peace in the elementary classroom, this work is broad in scope yet detailed in its approach to the fundamental principles of nonviolence.

The Power of Nonviolence

The Power of Nonviolence

Author: Richard Bartlett Gregg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108575058

Category: Political Science

Page:

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The Power of Nonviolence, written by Richard Bartlett Gregg in 1934 and revised in 1944 and 1959, is the most important and influential theory of principled or integral nonviolence published in the twentieth century. Drawing on Gandhi's ideas and practice, Gregg explains in detail how the organized power of nonviolence (power-with) exercised against violent opponents can bring about small and large transformative social change and provide an effective substitute for war. This edition includes a major introduction by political theorist, James Tully, situating the text in its contexts from 1934 to 1959, and showing its great relevance today. The text is the definitive 1959 edition with a foreword by Martin Luther King, Jr. It includes forewords from earlier editions, the chapter on class struggle and nonviolent resistance from 1934, a crucial excerpt from a 1929 preliminary study, a biography and bibliography of Gregg, and a bibliography of recent work on nonviolence.

The Force of Nonviolence

The Force of Nonviolence

Author: Judith Butler

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781788732772

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 238

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“Judith Butler is the most creative and courageous social theorist writing today." – Cornel West “Judith Butler is quite simply one of the most probing, challenging, and influential thinkers of our time.” – J. M. Bernstein Judith Butler’s new book shows how an ethic of nonviolence must be connected to a broader political struggle for social equality. Further, it argues that nonviolence is often misunderstood as a passive practice that emanates from a calm region of the soul, or as an individualist ethical relation to existing forms of power. But, in fact, nonviolence is an ethical position found in the midst of the political field. An aggressive form of nonviolence accepts that hostility is part of our psychic constitution, but values ambivalence as a way of checking the conversion of aggression into violence. One contemporary challenge to a politics of nonviolence points out that there is a difference of opinion on what counts as violence and nonviolence. The distinction between them can be mobilized in the service of ratifying the state’s monopoly on violence. Considering nonviolence as an ethical problem within a political philosophy requires a critique of individualism as well as an understanding of the psychosocial dimensions of violence. Butler draws upon Foucault, Fanon, Freud, and Benjamin to consider how the interdiction against violence fails to include lives regarded as ungrievable. By considering how “racial phantasms” inform justifications of state and administrative violence, Butler tracks how violence is often attributed to those who are most severely exposed to its lethal effects. The struggle for nonviolence is found in movements for social transformation that reframe the grievability of lives in light of social equality and whose ethical claims follow from an insight into the interdependency of life as the basis of social and political equality.

Perspectives on Nonviolence

Perspectives on Nonviolence

Author: V.K. Kool

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461244585

Category: Psychology

Page: 284

View: 630

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Paddock has referred to societies as "anti-violent" that Inhibit the expressIon of aggresSion. In his book Violence and Aggression, KE. Moyer nas made a brief but interesting comparison of several violent and nonviolent cultures. Whereas studies of violence have ranged from genetic, cultural to Situation effects, and have been pursued through empirical and nonempirical methods over the past several decades, nonviolence did not become a favorite area of study among social scientists. Although it is impossible to make a complete list of the various reasons for the lack of interest among social scientists on this subject, it is generally believed that a lack of understanding of the concept and a failure to either develop or apply adequate methods are to Olame. Therefore we are not surprized that nonviolence has remained, by and large, a favorite topic among religious thinkers and leaders only. A good example of how people have difficulty understanding the concept of nonviolence came to me when I delivered a lecture to a group of political science students several years ago. I experienced similar problems when I spoke to the history and political science professors. Subsequent dialogues with faculty members in other disciplines convinced me that our perspectives on nonVIolence were not commonly clear to all of us. or course, most of us did agree on one thing--that Is, there Is a distinct difference separating Eastern from Western views of nonviolence.