The Oxford History of the Irish Book, Volume III

The Oxford History of the Irish Book, Volume III

Author: Raymond Gillespie

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191514330

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 500

View: 794

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The Oxford History of the Irish Book is a major new series that charts the development of the book in Ireland from its origins within an early medieval manuscript culture to its current incarnation alongside the rise of digital media in the twenty-first century. Volume III: The Irish Book in English, 1550-1800 contains a series of groundbreaking essays that seek to explain the fortunes of printed word from the early Renaissance to the end of the eighteenth century. The essays in section one explain the development of print culture in the period, from its first incarnation in the small area of the English Pale around Dublin, dominated by the interests of the English authorities, to the more widespread dispersal of the printing press at the close of the eighteenth century, when provincial presses developed their own character and style either alongside or as a challenge to the dominant intellectual culture. Section two explains the crucial developments in the structure and technical innovation of the print trade; the role played by private and public collections of books; and the evidence of changing reading practices throughout the period. The third and longest section explores the impact of the rise of print. Essays examine the effect that the printed book had on religious and political life in Ireland, providing a case study of the impact of the French Revolution on pamphlets and propaganda in Ireland; the transformations illustrated in the history of historical writing, as well as in literature and the theatre, through the publication of play texts for a wide audience. Others explore the impact that print had on the history of science and the production of foreign language books. The volume concludes with an authoritative bibliographical essay outlining the sources that exist for the study of the book in early modern Ireland. This is an authoritative volume with essays by key scholars that will be the standard guide for many years to come.

Irish History For Dummies

Irish History For Dummies

Author: Mike Cronin

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119997283

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 970

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A rip-roaring ride through the history of the Emerald Isle Ireland’s story is an amazingly dramatic and intense one – and today the influence of Irish culture can be felt around the globe. This book helps you find out why, taking you on a rollercoaster journey through the highs and lows of Ireland’s past including invasions, battles, executions, religious divide, uprisings, emigration – and Riverdance! Mike Cronin is a lecturer at the Centre for Irish Programmes, Boston College, Dublin. He has written 5 books on Irish history. Discover: When and how Ireland became Celtic Ireland and Britain’s complex relationship The evolution of Irish culture How Irish emigration has affected the world Northern Ireland’s rocky road to peace

Two Centuries of Irish History (Routledge Revivals)

Two Centuries of Irish History (Routledge Revivals)

Author: R. Barry O'Brien

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317752219

Category: History

Page: 563

View: 884

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This collection of papers, first published in 1888, presents the history of Ireland as it unfolded from the Treaty of Limerick in 1691 until the Land Act of 1870 and the Home Rule Movement. Written at a time of great national interest in the ‘Irish Problem’, Two Centuries of Irish History tells the story of Ireland’s troubled relationship with successive British governments since the reign of William III, and charts the development of bitterness between opposing factions within Ireland itself. Whilst not lacking scholarly rigour, each contribution is lucidly written and accessible to the interested reader.

The Making of Modern Irish History

The Making of Modern Irish History

Author: D. George Boyce

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134807628

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 512

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This volume brings together distinguished historians of Ireland, each of whom tackles a key question, issue or event in Irish history since the eighteenth century and: * examines its historiography * assesses the context of new interpretations * considers the strengths and weaknesses of revisionist ideas * offers their own interpretation. Topics covered are not only of historical interest but, in the context of recent revisionist debates, of contemporary political significance. These original contributions take account of new evidence and perspectives, as well as up-to-date historical methodology. Their combination of synthesis and analysis represent a valuable guide to the present state of the writing of modern Irish history.

A History of Irish Working-Class Writing

A History of Irish Working-Class Writing

Author: Michael Pierse

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107149687

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 482

View: 746

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This book constitutes a wide-ranging and authoritative chronicle of the writing of Irish working-class experience. Ground-breaking in scholarship and comprehensive in scope, it represents a significant intervention in Irish Studies and English Literary Studies generally, charting representations of Irish working-class life from eighteenth-century poetry to Celtic Tiger drama.

A History of Irish Thought

A History of Irish Thought

Author: Thomas Duddy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134623525

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 965

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The first complete introduction to the subject ever published, A History of Irish Thought presents an inclusive survey of Irish thought and the history of Irish ideas against the backdrop of current political and social change in Ireland. Clearly written and engaging, the survey introduces an array of philosophers, polemicists, ideologists, satirists, scientists, poets and political and social reformers, from the anonymous seventh-century monk, the Irish Augustine, and John Scottus Eriugena, to the twentieth century and W.B. Yeats and Iris Murdoch. Thomas Duddy rediscovers the liveliest and most contested issues in the Irish past, and brings the history of Irish thought up to date. This volume will be of great value to anyone interested in Irish culture and its intellectual history.

A History of Irish Autobiography

A History of Irish Autobiography

Author: Liam Harte

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108548458

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 648

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A History of Irish Autobiography is the first ever critical survey of autobiographical self-representation in Ireland from its recoverable beginnings to the twenty-first century. The book draws on a wealth of original scholarship by leading experts to provide an authoritative examination of autobiographical writing in the English and Irish languages. Beginning with a comprehensive overview of autobiography theory and criticism in Ireland, the History guides the reader through seventeen centuries of Irish achievement in autobiography, a category that incorporates diverse literary forms, from religious tracts and travelogues to letters, diaries, and online journals. This ambitious book is rich in insight. Chapters are structured around key subgenres, themes, texts, and practitioners, each featuring a guide to recommended further reading. The volume's extensive coverage is complemented by a detailed chronology of Irish autobiography from the fifth century to the contemporary era, the first of its kind to be published.