How To Write A Horror Movie

How To Write A Horror Movie

Author: Neal Bell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429619359

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 170

View: 586

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How to Write a Horror Movie is a close look at an always-popular (but often disrespected) genre. It focuses on the screenplay and acts as a guide to bringing scary ideas to cinematic life using examples from great (and some not-so-great) horror movies. Author Neal Bell examines how the basic tools of the scriptwriter’s trade - including structure, dialogue, humor, mood, characters, and pace – can work together to embody personal fears that will resonate strongly on screen. Screenplay examples include classic works such as 1943’s I Walked With A Zombie and recent terrifying films that have given the genre renewed attention like writer/director Jordan Peele’s critically acclaimed and financially successful Get Out. Since fear is universal, the book considers films from around the world including the ‘found-footage’ [REC] from Spain (2007), the Swedish vampire movie, Let The Right One In (2008) and the Persian-language film Under The Shadow (2016). The book provides insights into the economics of horror-movie making, and the possible future of this versatile genre. It is the ideal text for screenwriting students exploring genre and horror, and aspiring scriptwriters who have an interest in horror screenplays.

Writing the Horror Movie

Writing the Horror Movie

Author: Marc Blake

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781441193476

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 272

View: 762

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Tales of horror have always been with us, from Biblical times to the Gothic novel to successful modern day authors and screenwriters. Though the genre is often maligned, it is huge in popularity and its resilience is undeniable. Marc Blake and Sara Bailey offer a detailed analysis of the horror genre, including its subgenres, tropes and the specific requirements of the horror screenplay. Tracing the development of the horror film from its beginnings in German Expressionism, the authors engage in a readable style that will appeal to anyone with a genuine interest in the form and the mechanics of the genre. This book examines the success of Universal Studio's franchises of the '30s to the Serial Killer, the Slasher film, Asian Horror, the Supernatural, Horror Vérité and current developments in the field, including 3D and remakes. It also includes step-by-step writing exercises, annotated extracts from horror screenplays and interviews with seasoned writers/directors/ producers discussing budget restrictions, screenplay form and formulas and how screenplays work during shooting.

Writing the Horror Movie

Writing the Horror Movie

Author: Marc Blake

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781441195067

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 272

View: 120

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Tales of horror have always been with us, from Biblical times to the Gothic novel to successful modern day authors and screenwriters. Though the genre is often maligned, it is huge in popularity and its resilience is undeniable. Marc Blake and Sara Bailey offer a detailed analysis of the horror genre, including its subgenres, tropes and the specific requirements of the horror screenplay. Tracing the development of the horror film from its beginnings in German Expressionism, the authors engage in a readable style that will appeal to anyone with a genuine interest in the form and the mechanics of the genre. This book examines the success of Universal Studio's franchises of the '30s to the Serial Killer, the Slasher film, Asian Horror, the Supernatural, Horror Vérité and current developments in the field, including 3D and remakes. It also includes step-by-step writing exercises, annotated extracts from horror screenplays and interviews with seasoned writers/directors/ producers discussing budget restrictions, screenplay form and formulas and how screenplays work during shooting.

How to Write a Horror Movie

How to Write a Horror Movie

Author: Neal Bell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0367151650

Category: Horror films

Page: 170

View: 990

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How to Write a Horror Movie is a close look at an always-popular (but often disrespected) genre. It focuses on the screenplay and acts as a guide to bringing scary ideas to cinematic life using examples from great (and some not-so-great) horror movies. Author Neal Bell examines how the basic tools of the scriptwriter's trade - including structure, dialogue, humor, mood, characters, and pace - can work together to embody personal fears that will resonate strongly on screen. Screenplay examples include classic works such as 1943's I Walked With A Zombie and recent terrifying films that have given the genre renewed attention like writer/director Jordan Peele's critically acclaimed and financially successful Get Out. Since fear is universal, the book considers films from around the world including the 'found-footage' [REC] from Spain (2007), the Swedish vampire movie, Let The Right One In (2008) and the Persian-language film Under The Shadow (2016). The book provides insights into the economics of horror-movie making, and the possible future of this versatile genre. It is the ideal text for screenwriting students exploring genre and horror, and aspiring scriptwriters who have an interest in horror screenplays.

Interviews with B Science Fiction and Horror Movie Makers

Interviews with B Science Fiction and Horror Movie Makers

Author: Tom Weaver

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786428588

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 425

View: 218

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For fans of SF and horror films, will there ever be a decade to compare with the 1950s? Actors, directors, producers, and crews prevailed over microbudgets and four-day shooting schedules to create enduring films. This book turns a long-overdue spotlight on many who made memorable contributions to that crowded, exhilarating filmmaking scene. John Agar, Beverly Garland, Samuel Z. Arkoff, Gene Corman, and two dozen more reminisce about the most popular genre titles of the era. Lengthy, in-depth interviews feature canny questions, pointed observations, rare photos, and good fun.

Screenwriting for Micro-Budget Films

Screenwriting for Micro-Budget Films

Author: David J Greenberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000508901

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 170

View: 383

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Screenwriting for micro-budget films can present its own challenges and this book takes the reader through all the considerations that need to be made to write an effective screenplay for a low-budget film. Drawing on his own experience, case studies from films such as Primer, Coherence and Reservoir Dogs, as well as the perspectives of working screenwriters such as Joe Swanberg and Alex Ross-Perry, Greenberg explores common pitfalls screenwriters face and suggests practical solutions. This book lays the groundworks of the realities of low-budget filmmaking and also talks through the practical aspects, such as story structure and genre considerations. Greenberg makes the process of writing a screenplay for a low-budget film accessible and creative, allowing student and independent filmmakers to tailor their writing for their films. This book is ideal for aspiring screenwriters, independent filmmakers and students of screenwriting.

Writing Diverse Characters For Fiction, TV or Film

Writing Diverse Characters For Fiction, TV or Film

Author: Lucy V. Hay

Publisher: Oldcastle Books Ltd

ISBN: 9780857301185

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 208

View: 332

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We're living in a time of unprecedented diversity in produced media content, with more characters appearing who are Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME), Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT), disabled, or from other religions or classes. What's more, these characters are increasingly appearing in genre pieces, accessible to the mainstream, instead of being hidden away in so-called 'worthier' pieces, as in the past. How to Write Diverse Characters discusses issues of race, disability, sexuality and transgender people with specific reference to characterisation - not only in movies and TV, but also novel writing. Taking in blockbuster movies such as Mad Max Fury Road, Russell T Davies' ground-breaking TV series Cucumber and and the controversial novel Gone Girl, the book explores: - How character role function really works - What is the difference between stereotype and archetype? - Why 'trope' does not mean what Twitter and Tumblr think it means - How the burden of casting affects both box office and audience perception - Why diversity is not about agendas, buzzwords or being 'politically correct' - What authenticity truly means and why research is so important - Why variety is key in ensuring true diversity in characterisation Writers have to catch up. Knowing not only what makes a 'good' diverse character doesn't always cut it; they need to know what agents, publishers, producers, filmmakers and commissioners are looking for - and why. This book gives writers the tools to create three dimensional, authentic characters ... who just happen to be diverse. 'A timely guide to creating original characters and reinvigorating tired storylines' - Debbie Moon, creator and showrunner, Wolfblood (BBC) 'Lucy V. Hay nails it' - Stephen Volk, BAFTA-winning screenwriter: Ghostwatch, Afterlife, The Awakening 'Packed with practical and inspirational insights' - Karol Griffiths, development consultant and script editor, clients include ITV, BBC, Warner Brothers

The Easy Way to Write Horror That Sells

The Easy Way to Write Horror That Sells

Author: Rob Parnell

Publisher: R&R Books Film Music

ISBN: PKEY:6610000287512

Category: Reference

Page: 115

View: 470

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Good horror is sophisticated. More and more writers, like Joe Hill and Jack Ketchum, are winding up in the literary section of your local bookshop or library. No longer is horror marginalized. It's increasingly seen as respectable and justifiably good writing. So, believe me, it's more than possible to make a very good living from writing horror and dark fantasy! Do you want success as a horror writer? And get to grips with a genre that will benefit all of your writing. Here’s what the book covers: * How to build suspense * How to create believable characters * How to come up with original and compelling ideas * How to create convincing monsters and psychological enemies * How to sustain a series of stories / books / movies * And much more!

On Writing Horror

On Writing Horror

Author: Mort Castle

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781582976938

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 830

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The masters of horror have united to teach you the secrets of success in the scariest genre of all! In On Writing Horror, Second Edition, Stephen King, Joyce Carol Oates, Harlan Ellison, David Morrell, Jack Ketchum, and many others tell you everything you need to know to successfully write and publish horror novels and short stories. Edited by the Horror Writers Association (HWA), a worldwide organization of writers and publishing professionals dedicated to promoting dark literature, On Writing Horror includes exclusive information and guidance from 58 of the biggest names in horror writing to give you the inspiration you need to start scaring and exciting readers and editors. You'll discover comprehensive instruction such as: • The art of crafting visceral violence, from Jack Ketchum • Why horror classics like Dracula, The Exorcist, and Hell House are as scary as ever, from Robert Weinberg • Tips for avoiding one of the biggest death knells in horror writing—predicable clichés—from Ramsey Campbell • How to use character and setting to stretch the limits of credibility, from Mort Castle With On Writing Horror, you can unlock the mystery surrounding classic horror traditions, revel in the art and craft of writing horror, and find out exactly where the genre is going next. Learn from the best, and you could be the next best-selling author keeping readers up all night long.

In the Spooklight

In the Spooklight

Author: Michael Arruda

Publisher: Crossroad Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 245

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IN THE SPOOKLIGHT is a collection of 115 horror movie review columns by Stoker nominated author and film critic Michael Arruda, covering movies from the silent era up until today. The column "In the Spooklight" has appeared monthly in the pages of THE OFFICIAL NEWSLETTER OF THE HORROR WRITERS ASSOCIATION since the summer of 2000. If you love horror movies, you're sure to enjoy Arruda's take on the genre. It's informative, humorous, and most of all, it's a heck of a lot of fun. Make a movie monster happy.

Genre Screenwriting

Genre Screenwriting

Author: Stephen V. Duncan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501305924

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 556

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It's simple: films need to have commercial value for the studios to produce them, distributors to sell them, and theater chains to screen them. While talent definitely plays a part in the writing process, it can be the well-executed formulaic approaches to the popular genres that will first get you noticed in the industry. Genre Screenwriting: How to Write Popular Screenplays That Sell does not attempt to probe in the deepest psyche of screenwriters and directors of famous or seminal films, nor does it attempt to analyze the deep theoretic machinations of films. Duncan's simple goal is to give the reader, the screenwriter, a practical guide to writing each popular film genre. Employing methods as diverse as using fairy tales to illustrate the 'how to' process for each popular genre, and discussing these popular genres in modern television and its relation to its big screen counterpart, Duncan provides a one-stop shop for novices and professionals alike.

Comedy-Horror Films

Comedy-Horror Films

Author: Bruce G. Hallenbeck

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786453788

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 255

View: 440

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Fun and fright have long been partners in the cinema, dating back to the silent film era and progressing to the Scary Movie franchise and other recent releases. This guide takes a comprehensive look at the comedy-horror movie genre, from the earliest stabs at melding horror and hilarity during the nascent days of silent film, to its full-fledged development with The Bat in 1926, to the Abbott and Costello films pitting the comedy duo against Frankenstein’s Monster, the Mummy and other Universal Studio monsters, continuing to such recent cult hits as Shaun of the Dead and Black Sheep. Selected short films such as Tim Burton’s Frankenweenie are also covered. Photos and promotional posters, interviews with actors and a filmography are included.