Higher Education in Music in the Twenty-First Century

Higher Education in Music in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Senior Lecturer in Music Bjorn Heile

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0367881357

Category:

Page: 212

View: 438

Get eBOOK →
In this book, the contributors reconsider the fundamentals of Music as a university discipline by engaging with the questions: What should university study of music consist of? Are there any aspects, repertoires, pieces, composers and musicians that we want all students to know about? Are there any skills that we expect them to be able to master? How can we guarantee the relevance, rigour and cohesiveness of our curriculum? What is specific to higher education in music and what does it mean now and for the future? The book addresses many of the challenges students and teachers face in current higher education; indeed, the majority of today's music students undoubtedly encounter a greater diversity of musical traditions and critical approaches to their study as well as a wider set of skills than their forebears. Welcome as these developments may be, they pose some risks too: more material cannot be added to the curriculum without either sacrificing depth for breadth or making much of it optional. The former provides students with a superficial and deceptive familiarity with a wide range of subject matter, but without the analytical skills and intellectual discipline required to truly master any of it. The latter easily results in a fragmentation of knowledge and skills, without a realistic opportunity for students to draw meaningful connections and arrive at a synthesis. The authors, Music academics from the University of Glasgow, provide case studies from their own extensive experience, which are complemented by an Afterword from Nicholas Cook, 1684 Professor of Music at the University of Cambridge. Together, they examine what students can and should learn about and from music and what skills and knowledge music graduates could or should possess in order to operate successfully in professional and public life. Coupled with these considerations are reflections on music's social function and universities' role in public life, concluding with the co

Higher Education in Music in the Twenty-First Century

Higher Education in Music in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Björn Heile

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317121954

Category: Music

Page: 212

View: 313

Get eBOOK →
In this book, the contributors reconsider the fundamentals of Music as a university discipline by engaging with the questions: What should university study of music consist of? Are there any aspects, repertoires, pieces, composers and musicians that we want all students to know about? Are there any skills that we expect them to be able to master? How can we guarantee the relevance, rigour and cohesiveness of our curriculum? What is specific to higher education in music and what does it mean now and for the future? The book addresses many of the challenges students and teachers face in current higher education; indeed, the majority of today’s music students undoubtedly encounter a greater diversity of musical traditions and critical approaches to their study as well as a wider set of skills than their forebears. Welcome as these developments may be, they pose some risks too: more material cannot be added to the curriculum without either sacrificing depth for breadth or making much of it optional. The former provides students with a superficial and deceptive familiarity with a wide range of subject matter, but without the analytical skills and intellectual discipline required to truly master any of it. The latter easily results in a fragmentation of knowledge and skills, without a realistic opportunity for students to draw meaningful connections and arrive at a synthesis. The authors, Music academics from the University of Glasgow, provide case studies from their own extensive experience, which are complemented by an Afterword from Nicholas Cook, 1684 Professor of Music at the University of Cambridge. Together, they examine what students can and should learn about and from music and what skills and knowledge music graduates could or should possess in order to operate successfully in professional and public life. Coupled with these considerations are reflections on music’s social function and universities’ role in public life, concluding with the conviction that a university education in music is more than a personal investment in one’s future; it contributes to the public good.

Globalization, Nationalism, and Music Education in the Twenty-First Century in Greater China

Globalization, Nationalism, and Music Education in the Twenty-First Century in Greater China

Author: Wai-Chung Ho

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9789048552207

Category: Education

Page: 343

View: 648

Get eBOOK →
This book will examine the recent development of school music education in Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan to illustrate how national policies for music in the school curriculum integrate music cultures and non-musical values in the relationship between national cultural identity and globalization. It will examine the ways in which policies for national identity formation and globalization interact to complement and contradict each other in the content of music education in these three Chinese territories. Meanwhile, tensions posed by the complex relationship between cultural diversity and political change have also led to a crisis of national identity in these three localities. The research methods of this book involve an analysis of official approved music textbooks, a survey questionnaire distributed to students attending music education programmes as well as primary and secondary school music teachers, and in-depth interviews with student teachers and schoolteachers in the three territories.

The Chamber Musician in the Twenty-First Century

The Chamber Musician in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Mine Doğantan-DacK

Publisher: MDPI

ISBN: 9783038975625

Category: Social Science

Page: 334

View: 944

Get eBOOK →
In recent research, there has been growing emphasis on the collaborative, social, and collective nature of musical behaviour and practices. Among the emerging hypotheses in this connection are the idea that listening to music is always listening together and being with the other; that music making is a matter of intercorporeality, mutuality, and emphatic attunement; and that creative agency in musical practices is fundamentally a distributed phenomenon. Chamber music provides an ideal context for the testing and actualization of these notions. This Special Issue on chamber music and the chamber musician aims to explore the psychological, social, cultural, historical, and artistic issues in the practice of classical chamber music in the twenty-first century. Contributions are invited on any of these aspects and issues involved in being a contemporary classical chamber musician. Authors are encouraged to contextualise their research by reference to the recent literature on collaborative musicking, and among the topics they may choose to address are the cultural and musical demands chamber musicians face and the implications of these demands for their artistic practice, the ways the twenty-first-century chamber musicians engage with historical practices, the newly emerging musical identities and artistic roles available to them, and expressivity in current chamber music practices.

Discourse and Disjuncture between the Arts and Higher Education

Discourse and Disjuncture between the Arts and Higher Education

Author: Jessica Hoffmann Davis

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137552433

Category: Art

Page: 263

View: 390

Get eBOOK →
This accessible and compelling collection of faculty reflections examines the tensions between the arts and academics and offers interdisciplinary alternatives for higher education. With an eye to teacher training, these artist scholars share insights, models, and personal experience that will engage and inspire educators in a range of post-secondary settings. The authors represent a variety of art forms, perspectives, and purposes for arts inclusive learning ranging from studio work to classroom teaching to urban settings in which the subject is equity and social justice. From the struggles of an arts concentrator at an Ivy League college to the challenge of reconciling the dual identities as artists and arts educators, the issues at hand are candid and compelling. The examples of discourse ranging from the broad stage of arts advocacy to an individual course or program give testimony to the power and promise of the arts in higher education.

What is Good Academic Writing?

What is Good Academic Writing?

Author: Melinda Whong

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350110403

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 208

View: 416

Get eBOOK →
The field of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) developed to address the needs of students whose mother tongue is not English. However, the linguistic competence required to achieve academic success at any university where English is the medium of instruction is a challenge for all students. While there are linguistic features common to academic literacy as a general genre, closer investigation reveals significant differences from one academic field to another. This volume asks what good writing is within specific disciplines, focussing on student work. Each chapter provides key insights by EAP professionals, based on their research in which they bring together analysis of student writing and interviews with subject specialists and markers who determine what 'good writing' is in their discipline. The volume includes chapters on established disciplines which have had less attention in the EAP and academic writing literature to date, including music, formal linguistics, and dentistry, as well as new and growing fields of study such as new media.

Twenty-First Century Fiction

Twenty-First Century Fiction

Author: S. Adiseshiah

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137035189

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 239

View: 107

Get eBOOK →
This lively new volume of essays examines what happens now in 21st century fiction. Fresh theoretical approaches to writers such as Salman Rushdie, David Peace, Margaret Atwood, and Hilary Mantel, and identifications of 21st-century themes, tropes and styles combine to produce a timely critical intervention into genuinely contemporary fiction.

A Higher Education for the Twenty-first Century

A Higher Education for the Twenty-first Century

Author: Bruno Aguilera-Barchet

Publisher: Wilfried Martens Centre for European Studies

ISBN: 9782930632131

Category: Political Science

Page: 39

View: 843

Get eBOOK →
PDF available for free on: http://martenscentre.eu/publications/higher-education-twenty-first-century-european-and-us-approaches Europeans and Americans have a lot to learn from one another when it comes to higher education. The US offers a wider and more diversified range of choice in higher education, and more Americans than Europeans attend higher education institutions. Conversely, European universities are more intellectually oriented, and European students generally are better equipped to analyse and adapt to new situations. This paper analyses the strengths and weaknesses of both systems and assesses how each can benefit from the other.

Annunciations: Sacred Music for the Twenty-First Century

Annunciations: Sacred Music for the Twenty-First Century

Author: George Corbett

Publisher: Open Book Publishers

ISBN: 9781783747290

Category: Music

Page: 394

View: 663

Get eBOOK →
Our contemporary culture is communicating ever-increasingly through the visual, through film, and through music. This makes it ever more urgent for theologians to explore the resources of art for enriching our understanding and experience of the Judeo-Christian tradition. Annunciations: Sacred Music for the twenty-First Century, edited by George Corbett, answers this need, evaluating the relationship between the sacred and the composition, performance, and appreciation of music. Through the theme of ‘annunciations’, this volume interrogates how, when, why, through and to whom God communicates in the Old and New Testaments. In doing so, it tackles the intimate relationship between Scriptural reflection and musical practice in the past, its present condition, and what the future might hold. Annunciations comprises three parts. Part I sets out flexible theological and compositional frameworks for a constructive relationship between the sacred and music. Part II presents the reflections of theologians and composers involved in collaborating on new pieces of sacred choral music, alongside the six new scores and links to the recordings. Part III considers the reality of programming and performing sacred works today. This volume provides an indispensable resource for scholars and artists working at the interface between theology and the arts, and for those involved in sacred music. However, it will also be of interest to anyone concerned with the ways in which the Divine communicates through word and artistry to humanity.

Technology and Workplace Skills for the Twenty-First Century

Technology and Workplace Skills for the Twenty-First Century

Author: Deane E. Neubauer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137491923

Category: Education

Page: 222

View: 405

Get eBOOK →
Technology and Workplace Skills for the Twenty-First Century examines many of the rapid changes taking place at the intersection of workplace demands and higher education throughout the Asia Pacific region. The globalized, interdependent twenty-first century workforce is built around computing, communication, and automation. These characteristics have changed the ways in which higher education is connected to the workforce and raised the stakes for educating students for the changing workforce. In this book, scholars and education leaders throughout Asia Pacific and the US investigate how the changing needs of the workforce have shaped higher education's curriculum, methods, and orientation, and show how different Asia Pacific countries have responded differently to these challenges.

Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century

Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Abdulla Y. Al-Hawaj

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9780203885772

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 214

View: 659

Get eBOOK →
The skills, creativity, and research developed through higher education are major factors in any society‘s success in creating jobs and advancing prosperity. Universities and colleges play a vital r le in expanding opportunity and promoting social justice. The papers in this book reflect the main objective of a conference held in June 2007 at Ahlia

Young Faculty in the Twenty-First Century

Young Faculty in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Maria Yudkevich

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN: 9781438457284

Category: Education

Page: 378

View: 582

Get eBOOK →
Demonstrates how the success of universities depends on the working conditions of the younger academic generation. Young faculty are the future of academia, yet without attractive career paths for young academics, the future of the university is bleak. Featuring case studies from Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Norway, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, and the United States, Young Faculty in the Twenty-First Century is the first book to analyze issues facing early-career higher education faculty in an international context. The contributors discuss how young academics are affected by contracts, salaries, the structure of careers, and institutional conditions. The analyses cover the full spectrum of the academic profession, including part-time jobs and short-term contracts, both in public and private institutions. The book also addresses what universities must do in order to attract young, qualified candidates. Maria Yudkevich is Vice Rector and Associate Professor at the National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia. She is the coeditor (with Philip G. Altbach, Liz Reisberg, Gregory Androushchak, and Iván F. Pacheco) of Paying the Professoriate: A Global Comparison of Compensation and Contracts. Philip G. Altbach is Research Professor and Director of the Center for International Higher Education at Boston College. He is the author and editor of many books, including (with William A. Smith and Kofi Lomotey) The Racial Crisis in American Higher Education: Continuing Challenges for the Twenty-First Century, Revised Edition, also published by SUNY Press. Laura E. Rumbley is Lecturer and Associate Director of the Center for International Higher Education at Boston College, and coauthor (with Philip G. Altbach and Liz Reisberg) of Trends in Global Higher Education: Tracking an Academic Revolution.