Challenging Boardroom Homogeneity

Challenging Boardroom Homogeneity

Author: Aaron A. Dhir

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107014879

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 330

View: 734

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Uses interviews with corporate board directors in Norway and analysis of US corporate securities filings to investigate quotas and disclosure in hiring practices.

The Future of Tech Is Female

The Future of Tech Is Female

Author: Douglas M. Branson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479806041

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 313

View: 966

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An accessible and timely guide to increasing female presence and leadership in tech companies Tech giants like Apple and Google are among the fastest growing companies in the world, leading innovations in design and development. The industry continues to see rapid growth, employing millions of people: in the US it is at the epicenter of the American economy. So why is it that only 5% of senior executives in the tech industry are female? Underrepresentation of women on boards of directors, in the C-suite, and as senior managers remains pervasive in this industry. As tech companies are plagued with high-profile claims of harassment and discrimination, and salary discrepancies for comparable work, one asks what prevents women from reaching management roles, and, more importantly, what can be done to fix it? The Future of Tech is Female considers the paradoxes involved in women’s ascent to leadership roles, suggesting industry-wide solutions to combat gender inequality. Drawing upon 15 years of experience in the field, Douglas M. Branson traces the history of women in the information technology industry in order to identify solutions for the issues facing women today. Branson explores a variety of solutions such as mandatory quota laws for female employment, pledge programs, and limitations on the H1-B VISA program, and grapples with the challenges facing women in IT from a range of perspectives. Branson unpacks the plethora of reasons women should hold leadership roles, both in and out of this industry, concluding with a call to reform attitudes toward women in one particular IT branch, the video and computer gaming field, a gateway to many STEM futures. An invaluable resource for anyone invested in gender equality in corporate governance, The Future of Tech is Female lays out the first steps toward a more diverse future for women in tech leadership

Women and Leadership

Women and Leadership

Author: Deborah L. Rhode

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190614713

Category:

Page: 256

View: 144

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For most of recorded history, men have held nearly all of the most powerful leadership positions. Today, although women occupy an increasing percentage of leadership positions, in America they hold less than a fifth of positions in both the public and private sectors. The United States ranks 78th in the world for women's representation in political office. In politics, although women constitute a majority of the electorate, they account for only 18 percent of Congress, 10 percent of governors, and 12 percent of mayors of the nation's 100 largest cities. In academia, women account for a majority of college graduates, but only about a quarter of full professors and university presidents. In law, women are almost half of law school graduates, but only 17 percent of the equity partners of major firms, and 22 percent of Fortune 500 general counsels. In business, women constitute a third of MBA graduates, but only 5 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs. In Women and Leadership, the eminent legal scholar Deborah L. Rhode focuses on women's underrepresentation in leadership roles and asks why it persists and what we can do about it. Although organizations generally stand to gain from increasing gender equity in leadership, women's underrepresentation is persistent and pervasive. Rhode explores the reasons, including women's family roles, unconscious gender bias, and exclusion from professional development networks. She stresses that we cannot address the problem at the individual level; instead, she argues that we need broad-based strategies that address the deep-seated structural and cultural conditions facing women. She surveys a range of professions-politics, management, law, and academia-and draws from a survey of prominent women to develop solutions that can successfully chip away at the imbalance. These include developing robust women-to-women networks, enacting laws and policies that address work/life imbalances, and training programs that start at an earlier age. Rhode's clear exploration of the leadership gap and her compelling policy prescriptions will make this an essential book for anyone interested in leveling the playing field for women leaders in America.

Quality Shareholders

Quality Shareholders

Author: Lawrence A. Cunningham

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231552776

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 252

View: 493

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Anyone can buy stock in a public company, but not all shareholders are equally committed to a company’s long-term success. In an increasingly fragmented financial world, shareholders’ attitudes toward the companies in which they invest vary widely, from time horizon to conviction. Faced with indexers, short-term traders, and activists, it is more important than ever for businesses to ensure that their shareholders are dedicated to their missions. Today’s companies need “quality shareholders,” as Warren Buffett called those who “load up and stick around,” or buy large stakes and hold for long periods. Lawrence A. Cunningham offers an expert guide to the benefits of attracting and keeping quality shareholders. He demonstrates that a high density of dedicated long-term shareholders results in numerous comparative and competitive advantages for companies and their managers, including a longer runway to execute business strategy and a loyal cohort against adversity. Cunningham explores dozens of corporate practices and policies—such as rational capital allocation, long-term performance metrics, and a shareholder orientation—that can help shape the shareholder base and bring in committed owners. Focusing on the benefits for corporations and their investors, he reveals what draws quality shareholders to certain companies and what it means to have them in an investor base. This book is vital reading for investors, executives, and directors seeking to understand and attract the kind of shareholders that their companies need.

Predatory Lending and the Destruction of the African-American Dream

Predatory Lending and the Destruction of the African-American Dream

Author: Janis Sarra

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108853330

Category: Law

Page:

View: 181

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Since the Great Recession of 2008, the racial wealth gap between black and white Americans has continued to widen. In Predatory Lending and the Destruction of the African-American Dream, Janis Sarra and Cheryl Wade detail the reasons for this failure by analyzing the economic exploitation of African Americans, with a focus on predatory practices in the home mortgage context. They also examine the failure of reform and litigation efforts ostensibly aimed at addressing this form of racial discrimination. This research, augmented by first-hand narratives, provides invaluable insight into the racial wealth gap by vividly illustrating the predation that targets African-American consumers and examining the intentionally obfuscating settlement terms of cases brought by the U.S. Department of Justice, states attorneys, and municipalities. The authors conclude by offering structural, systemic changes to address predatory practices. This important work should be read by anyone seeking to understand racial inequality in the United States.

Harvard Law Review: Volume 129, Number 4 - February 2016

Harvard Law Review: Volume 129, Number 4 - February 2016

Author: Harvard Law Review

Publisher: Quid Pro Books

ISBN: 9781610278140

Category: Law

Page: 306

View: 122

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The February 2016 issue, Number 4, features these contents: • Article, "Constitutional Bad Faith," by David E. Pozen • Book Review, "No Immunity: Race, Class, and Civil Liberties in Times of Health Crisis," by Michele Goodwin & Erwin Chemerinsky • Book Review, "How Much Does Speech Matter?," by Leslie Kendrick • Note, "State Bans on Debtors' Prisons and Criminal Justice Debt" • Note, "Digital Duplications and the Fourth Amendment" • Note, "Reconciling State Sovereign Immunity with the Fourteenth Amendment" • Note, "Suspended Justice: The Case Against 28 U.S.C. § 2255's Statute of Limitations" In addition, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on the exclusionary rule in knock-and-announce violations; FTC regulation of data security; voting rights, disparate impact, and the Texas voter ID law; and fair labor, 'primary beneficiary,' and unpaid interns. The issue includes analysis of Recent Regulations on Dodd-Frank and mandatory pay disclosure; and on Clean Air Act regulation of carbon emissions from existing power plants. Also included are a Recent Event comment on the killing of a non-university-affiliate by campus police and a Recent Book comment on Richard McAdams' 2015 book The Expressive Powers of Law. Finally, the issue includes several brief comments on Recent Publications. The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the fourth issue of academic year 2015-2016.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution and Its Impact on Ethics

The Fourth Industrial Revolution and Its Impact on Ethics

Author: Katharina Miller

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030570200

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 359

View: 390

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This book tackles the ethical problems of the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” (4IR) and offers readers an overview of the ethical challenges connected to Artificial Intelligence (AI), encryption and the finance industry. It specifically focuses on the situation of females in these industries, from women lawyers, judges, attorneys-at-law, investors and bankers, to portfolio managers, solicitors and civil servants. As the 4IR is more than “just” a technology-driven transformation, this book is a call to policymakers and business leaders to harness new technologies in order to create a more inclusive, human-centered future. It offers many practical cases of proactive change agents, and offers solutions to the ethical challenges in connection with implementing revolutionary disruptive products that often eliminate the intermediary. In addition, the book addresses sustainable finance in startups. In this context, education, training, agility and life-long learning in financial literacy are some of the key solutions highlighted here. The respective contributors supply a diverse range of perspectives, so as to promote a multi-stakeholder approach.

Corporations Are People Too

Corporations Are People Too

Author: Kent Greenfield

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300240801

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 902

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Why we’re better off treating corporations as people under the law—and making them behave like citizens Are corporations people? The U.S. Supreme Court launched a heated debate when it ruled in Citizens United that corporations can claim the same free speech rights as humans. Should corporations be able to claim rights of free speech, religious conscience, and due process? Kent Greenfield provides an answer: Sometimes. With an analysis sure to challenge the assumptions of both progressives and conservatives, Greenfield explores corporations' claims to constitutional rights and the foundational conflicts about their obligations in society. He argues that a blanket opposition to corporate personhood is misguided, since it is consistent with both the purpose of corporations and the Constitution itself that corporations can claim rights at least some of the time. The problem with Citizens United is not that corporations have a right to speak, but for whom they speak. The solution is not to end corporate personhood but to require corporations to act more like citizens.

Women on Boards in China and India

Women on Boards in China and India

Author: Alice de Jonge

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000583915

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 166

View: 422

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This book provides an in-depth comparative exploration of gender diversity in corporate leadership roles in China and India. Set in the context of changing corporate governance norms, it utilises both quantitative and qualitative research methods to understand the key determinants of gender disparity. It identifies global-, national-, and enterprise-level factors shaping gender diversity in the corporate boardroom and measures their economic, political, and socio-cultural impacts on two of the world’s largest economies. The book draws upon narratives of women leaders to bridge the gap between theory and data, examining possible solutions to achieve gender parity in organisational hierarchies. Topical and detailed, this book will be an essential read for scholars, practitioners, and researchers of gender studies, corporate governance, business studies, human resource management, public policy, social anthropology, and Asian studies.

Corporate Reporting Under the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's Diversity Disclosure Rule

Corporate Reporting Under the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's Diversity Disclosure Rule

Author: Aaron A. Dhir

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1308849074

Category:

Page: 34

View: 876

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This is chapter 6 of Challenging Boardroom Homogeneity: Corporate Law, Governance, and Diversity (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in 2015). In this chapter I investigate the disclosure-based approach to addressing diversity in corporate governance. In 2009, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission adopted a rule requiring publicly traded firms to report on whether they consider diversity in identifying director nominees and, if so, how. The rule also requires firms that have adopted a diversity policy to describe how they implement the policy and assess its effectiveness. The rule does not define “diversity,” however, leaving it to corporations to give this term meaning.I present findings from my mixed-methods content analysis of corporate disclosures submitted during the first four years of the rule in order to provide empirical elucidation of how the rule operates in practice. The research sample consists of a hand-collected dataset of the 2010-2013 definitive proxy statements of S&P 100 firms. I am interested in learning how these firms, in responding to the rule, construct the concept of diversity through their public discourse. What does diversity, viewed through the prism of legal regulation, mean to market participants? How do they interpret and understand this socio-political idea in the absence of a regulatory definition? How is diversity constituted and discursively performed?The SEC's disclosure rule has caused US corporations to establish a vocabulary of diversity. My study shows that “diversity” carries multiple connotations for these firms. My most salient finding, however, is that when interpreting this concept in the absence of regulatory guidance, the dominant corporate discourse is experiential rather than identity-based. Firms most frequently define diversity with reference to a director's prior experience or other nonidentity-based factors rather than his or her socio-demographic characteristics. The data provide a unique window into the potential meanings of “diversity” in the corporate governance setting, as well as the limits of a strategy that permits corporations to give the term their own definition.