Buckeye Cookery and Practical Housekeeping

Buckeye Cookery and Practical Housekeeping

Author: Buckeye Publishing Company

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 9781557095152

Category: Cooking

Page: 470

View: 178

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Originally published in 1877, this facsimile of Ohio's premiere cookbook from the 19th century covers all aspects of cooking and housekeeping, from breadmaking and canning to curing meats, management of help and medical advice.

Centennial Buckeye Cook Book

Centennial Buckeye Cook Book

Author: Andrew F. Smith

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

ISBN: 0814208363

Category: Cooking

Page: 408

View: 139

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The first edition of the Centennial Buckeye Cook Book was published in 1876. Between 1876 and 1905, a total of thirty-two editions of the cookbook were published, and more than one million copies sold. The book began as a project of the Marysville, Ohio, First Congregational Church when the women of the church decided to publish a cookbook in order to raise money to build a parsonage. Their effort launched a cookbook that rapidly became one of the most popular publications of nineteenth-century America. This is the first reprint of the original 1876 edition.

Food on the Frontier

Food on the Frontier

Author: Marjorie Kreidberg

Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society Press

ISBN: 0873510976

Category: Cooking

Page: 332

View: 733

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Combines social history with more than 275 authentic recipes, collected from old cookbooks, household guides, letters, diaries, and newspapers, from "the good old days" of Minnesota's frontier years -- many of them kitchen-tested and updated for use today.

Food in the Gilded Age

Food in the Gilded Age

Author: Robert Dirks

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442245143

Category: Cooking

Page: 226

View: 341

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The Gilded Age is renowned for a variety of reasons, including its culture of conspicuous consumption among the newly rich. In the domain of food, conspicuous consumption manifested itself in appetites for expensive dishes and lavish dinner parties. These received ample publicity at the time, resulting later on in well-developed historical depictions of upper-class eating habits. This book delves into the eating habits of people of lesser means. Concerning the African American community, the working class, the impoverished, immigrants, and others our historical representations have been relatively superficial. The author changes that by turning to the late nineteenth century’s infant science of nutrition for a look at eating and drinking through the lens of the earliest food consumption studies conducted in the United States. These were undertaken by scientists, mostly chemists, who left their laboratories to observe food consumption in kitchens, dining rooms, and various institutional settings. Their insistence on careful measurement resulted in a substantial body of detailed reports on the eating habits of ordinary people. This work sheds new light on what most Americans were cooking and eating during the Gilded Age.

Food in the United States, 1820s-1890

Food in the United States, 1820s-1890

Author: Susan Williams

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313332452

Category: Cooking

Page: 268

View: 772

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The period from the 1820s to 1890 was one of invention, new trends, and growth in the American food culture. Inventions included the potato chip and Coca-Cola. Patents were taken out for the tin can, canning jars, and condensed milk. Vegetarianism was promulgated. Factories and mills such as Pillsbury came into being, as did Quaker Oats and other icons of American food. This volume describes the beginnings of many familiar mainstays of our daily life and consumer culture. It chronicles the shift from farming to agribusiness. Cookbooks proliferated and readers will trace the modernization of cooking, from the hearth to the stove, and the availability of refrigeration. Regional foodways are covered, as are how various classes ate at home or away. A final chapter covers the diet fads, which were similar to those being touted today. The period from the 1820s to 1890 was one of invention, new trends, and growth in the American food culture. Inventions included the potato chip and Coca-Cola. Patents were taken out for the tin can, canning jars, and condensed milk. Vegetarianism was promulgated. Factories and mills such as Pillsbury came into being. This volume describes the beginnings of many familiar mainstays of our daily life and consumer culture. It chronicles the shift from farming to agribusiness. Cookbooks proliferated and readers will trace the modernization of cooking, from the hearth to the stove, and the availability of refrigeration. Regional foodways are covered, as are how various classes ate at home or away. A final chapter covers the diet fads, which were similar to those being touted today. The volume is targeted toward high school students on up to the general public who want to complement U.S. history cultural studies or better understand the fascinating groundwork for the modern kitchen, cook, and food industry. Abundant insight into the daily life of women is given. Period illustrations and recipes and a chronology round out the text.