A Great and Shining Road

A Great and Shining Road

Author: John Hoyt Williams

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803297890

Category: Transportation

Page: 341

View: 728

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The Union Pacific and Central Pacific Railroads were officially joined on May 10, 1869 at Promontory Point, Utah, with the driving of a golden spike. This historic ceremony marked the completion of the first transcontinental railroad. Spanning the Sierras and the “Great American Desert,” the tracks connected San Francisco to Council Bluffs, Iowa. A Great and Shining Road is the exciting story of a mammoth feat that called forth entrepreneurial daring, financial wizardry, technological innovation, political courage and chicanery, and the heroism of thousands of laborers.

The Great American Railroad War

The Great American Railroad War

Author: Dennis Drabelle

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9781250015051

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 306

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How two of America's greatest authors took on the Central Railroad monopoly The notorious Central Pacific Railroad riveted the attention of two great American writers: Ambrose Bierce and Frank Norris. In The Great American Railroad War, Dennis Drabelle tells a classic story of corporate greed vs. the power of the pen. The Central Pacific Railroad accepted US Government loans; but, when the loans fell due, the last surviving founder of the railroad avoided repayment. Bierce, at the behest of his boss William Randolph Hearst, swung into action writing over sixty stinging articles that became a signal achievement in American journalism. Later, Norris focused the first volume of his trilogy, The Octopus, on the freight cars of a thinly disguised version of the Central Pacific. The Great American Railroad War is a lively chapter of US history pitting two of America's greatest writers against one of America's most powerful corporations. "Readers with interests in western American history or the origins of today’s political quagmires will find much to relish. " - Publishers Weekly

Justice Stephen Field

Justice Stephen Field

Author: Paul Kens

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015041013296

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 376

View: 555

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Outspoken and controversial, Stephen Field served on the Supreme Court from his appointment by Lincoln in 1863 through the closing years of the century. No justice had ever served longer on the Court, and few were as determined to use the Court to lead the nation into a new and exciting era. Paul Kens shows how Field ascended to such prominence, what influenced his legal thought and court opinions, and why both are still very relevant today. One of the famous gold rush forty-niners, Field was a founder of Marysville, California, a state legislator, and state supreme court justice. His decisions from the state bench and later from the federal circuit court often placed him in the middle of tense conflicts over the distribution of the land and mineral wealth of the new state. Kens illuminates how Field's experiences in early California influenced his jurisprudence and produced a theory of liberty that reflected both the ideals of his Jacksonian youth and the teachings of laissez-faire economics. During the time that Field served on the U.S. Supreme Court, the nation went through the Civil War and Reconstruction and moved from an agrarian to an industrial economy in which big business dominated. Fear of concentrated wealth caused many reformers of the time to look to government as an ally in the preservation of their liberty. In the volatile debates over government regulation of business, Field became a leading advocate of substantive due process and liberty of contract, legal doctrines that enabled the Court to veto state economic legislation and heavily influenced constitutional law well into the twentieth century. In the effort to curb what he viewed as the excessive power of government, Field tended to side with business and frequently came into conflict with reformers of his era. Gracefully written and filled with sharp insights, Kens' study sheds new light on Field's role in helping the Court define the nature of liberty and determine the extent of constitutional protection of property. By focusing on the political, economic, and social struggles of his time, it explains Field's jurisprudence in terms of conflicting views of liberty and individualism. It firmly establishes Field as a persuasive spokesman for one side of that conflict and as a prototype for the modern activist judge, while providing an important new view of capitalist expansion and social change in Gilded Age America.

Why Lawsuits are Good for America

Why Lawsuits are Good for America

Author: Carl T. Bogus

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814737941

Category: Law

Page: 265

View: 653

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Judging by the frequency with which it makes an appearance in television news shows and late night stand up routines, the frivolous lawsuit has become part and parcel of our national culture. A woman sues McDonald’s because she was scalded when she spilled her coffee. Thousands file lawsuits claiming they were injured by Agent Orange, silicone breast implants, or Bendectin although scientists report these substances do not cause the diseases in question. The United States, conventional wisdom has it, is a hyperlitigious society, propelled by avaricious lawyers, harebrained judges, and runaway juries. Lawsuits waste money and time and, moreover, many are simply groundless. Carl T. Bogus is not so sure. In Why Lawsuits Are Good for America, Bogus argues that common law works far better than commonly understood. Indeed, Bogus contends that while the system can and occasionally does produce “wrong” results, it is very difficult for it to make flatly irrational decisions. Blending history, theory, empirical data, and colorful case studies, Bogus explains why the common law, rather than being outdated, may be more necessary than ever. As Bogus sees it, the common law is an essential adjunct to governmental regulation—essential, in part, because it is not as easily manipulated by big business. Meanwhile, big business has launched an all out war on the common law. “Tort reform”—measures designed to make more difficult for individuals to sue corporations—one of the ten proposals in the Republican Contract With America, and George W. Bush’s first major initiative as Governor of Texas. And much of what we have come to believe about the system comes from a coordinated propaganda effort by big business and its allies. Bogus makes a compelling case for the necessity of safeguarding the system from current assaults. Why Lawsuits Are Good for America provides broad historical overviews of the development of American common law, torts, products liability, as well as fresh and provocative arguments about the role of the system of “disciplined democracy” in the twenty-first century.

Revered Commander, Maligned General

Revered Commander, Maligned General

Author: Michael E. Shay

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 9780826219220

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 862

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Major General Clarence Ransom Edwards is a vital figure in American military history, yet his contribution to the U.S. efforts in World War I has often been ignored or presented in unflattering terms. Most accounts focus on the disagreements he had with General John J. Pershing, who dismissed Edwards from the command of the 26th (“Yankee”) Division just weeks before the war's end. The notoriety of the Pershing incident has caused some to view Edwards as simply a “political general” with a controversial career. But Clarence Edwards, though often a divisive figure, was a greater man than that. A revered and admired officer whose men called him “Daddy,” Edwards attained an impressive forty-year career, one matched by few wartime leaders. Michael E. Shay presents a complete portrait of this notable American and his many merits in Revered Commander, Maligned General. This long-overdue first full-length biography of General Clarence Edwards opens with his early years in Cleveland, Ohio and his turbulent times at West Point. The book details the crucial roles Edwards filled in staff and field commands for the Army before the outbreak of World War I in 1917: Adjutant-General with General Henry Ware Lawton in the Philippine-American War, first chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, and commander of U.S. forces in the Panama Canal Zone. Revered Commander, Maligned General follows Edwards as he forms the famous Yankee Division and leads his men into France. The conflict between Edwards and Pershing is placed in context, illuminating the disputes that led to Edwards being relieved of command. This well-researched biography quotes a wealth of primary sources in recounting the life of an important American, a man of loyalty and service who is largely misunderstood. Photographs of Edwards, his troops, and his kin—many from Edwards’ own collection—complement the narrative. In addition, several maps aid readers in following General Edwards as his career moves from the U.S. to Central America to Europe and back stateside. Shay’s portrayalof General Edwards finally provides a balanced account of this unique U.S. military leader.

Sam Houston

Sam Houston

Author: John Hoyt Williams

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780671880712

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 574

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Against the tumultuous backdrop of early Texas history, Williams sketches a vivid portrait of a truly American legend. Map.

A Tangled Web

A Tangled Web

Author: Jane Peart

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 9780310865568

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 144

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Perhaps Jane Peart’s finest novel--the story of a young woman in the early 1900s who overcomes adversity by embracing faith Darcy Welburne has seen enough of politics from the long line of judges in her family. So when Grady, her fiancé, tells her he is running for sheriff, she sets off to find the new freedom promised by the American West. She escapes to Juniper Junction, thinking a teaching job is waiting for her. When she discovers the position has already been filled, she resigns herself to becoming a Harvey Girl--a waitress at the chain of restaurants in the newly opened Arizona territory. Ashamed to tell her family that she is "just a waitress," she becomes a "marvel of make-believe," and, ignoring the pinches of her conscience, she embarks on an elaborate deception, sending home letters full of fictitious students, townspeople, and events recreated from the staff and diners of the Harvey House. Her life seems to be going well. She meets Ted, a handsome young architect. But then Grady shows up with a big group of politicians--including Teddy Roosevelt--and recognizes her. Darcy’s untruthfulness is revealed. She fights with Grady. She loses face before Ted. She has to return to her family and make things right. But through it all, her faith grows stronger and readers are assured that all will work out in the end.

Constables, Marshals, and More

Constables, Marshals, and More

Author: Lorie Rubenser

Publisher: University of North Texas Press

ISBN: 9781574413274

Category: Political Science

Page: 190

View: 867

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Most students of criminal justice, and the general public, think of policing along the three basic types of municipal, sheriff, and state police. Little is known about other police work, such as the constable. And yet other alternative policing positions are of vital importance to law enforcement. This book remedies that imbalance in the literature on policing.

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF LOUISA MAY ALCOTT: Novels, Short Stories, Plays & Poems (Illustrated Edition)

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF LOUISA MAY ALCOTT: Novels, Short Stories, Plays & Poems (Illustrated Edition)

Author: Louisa May Alcott

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: 9788027200641

Category: Fiction

Page: 2470

View: 260

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This unique illustrated collection of "THE COMPLETE WORKS OF LOUISA MAY ALCOTT" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Content: Biography Louisa May Alcott: Her Life, Letters, and Journals Novels Little Women Good Wives Little Men Jo's Boys Moods The Mysterious Key and What It Opened An Old Fashioned Girl Work: A Story of Experience Eight Cousins; or, The Aunt-Hill Rose in Bloom: A Sequel to Eight Cousins Under the Lilacs Jack and Jill: A Village Story Behind a Mask, or a Woman's Power The Abbot's Ghost, Or Maurice Treherne's Temptation A Modern Mephistopheles Pauline's Passion and Punishment Short Story Collections Aunt Jo's Scrap-Bag Shawl-Straps Jimmy's Cruise in the Pinafore An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving Lulu's Library Flower Fables On Picket Duty, and other tales Spinning-Wheel Stories A Garland for Girls Silver Pitchers: and Independence, a Centennial Love Story A Merry Christmas & Other Christmas Stories Other Short Stories and Novelettes Hospital Sketches Marjorie's Three Gifts Perilous Play A Whisper in the Dark Lost in a Pyramid, or the Mummy's Curse A Modern Cinderella A Country Christmas Aunt Kipp Debby's Debut My Red Cap Nelly's Hospital Psyche's Art The Brothers Poetry A.B.A A Little Grey Curl To Papa In Memoriam Plays Bianca Captive of Castile Ion Norna; or, The Witch's Curse The Greek Slave The Unloved Wife Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888) was an American novelist and poet best known as the author of the classic Little Women and its sequels Little Men and Jo's Boys. Alcott was an abolitionist and a feminist. "Little Women" is a semi-autobiographical account of the author's childhood with her sisters in Concord, Massachusetts. "Good Wives" followed the March sisters into adulthood and marriage. "Little Men" detailed Jo's life at the Plumfield School that she founded with her husband Professor Bhaer. "Jo's Boys" completed the "March Family Saga".